VETERINARY ECONOMICS, Aug 1, 2006 - Veterinary Economics
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS, Aug 1, 2006
Checking in
Finding facts in the figures
By Marnette Denell Falley
It's the numbers that drive this special annual report. We reviewed more than 15 surveys specifically about the veterinary profession, and conducted two of our own, just for this issue. Our editorial team looked at 1000s of numbers. We talked to at least 40 experts to develop survey questions and concise analysis that pulls the key points from the study data. And that's not counting all of you who contributed by participating in studies.
Industry Issues
Clocking in
By Veterinary Economics Staff
Are new grads' expectations about quality of life and child rearing changing the veterinary workweek?
Giving away care
By Veterinary Economics Staff
Your colleagues face the same struggle about how and when to help those in need. Here's how they balance the needs of their businesses with their compassion for pets and people.
How DVMs measure up against MDs
By Veterinary Economics Staff
Evolving technology continues to make veterinary diagnostics and treatment increasingly similar to human medicine. But your opinions on industry issues diverge dramatically.
The sweet taste of retirement
By Veterinary Economics Staff
Maintaining some semblance of your current lifestyle in retirement doesn't have to be a "pie in the sky" idea—if you plan ahead. (Hey, 30-somethings: We're talking to you!)
Weighing the changes raised by specialty practice
By Veterinary Economics Staff
Specialty practices offer services that are sometimes more than a primary care facility can handle. But more primary care practitioners are branching out.
Ensure care with insurance
By Veterinary Economics Staff
Relatively few clients have pet insurance, but the numbers are steadily rising. And that's a good thing for your business.
Is gender still an issue?
By Veterinary Economics Staff
Respondents say yes. Female veterinarians face unique challenges.
Don't x-ray clients' wallets
By Veterinary Economics Staff
25 percent of practitioners say they start seeing resistance when a bill lands between $200 and $400. But there's no way to know which clients will opt for your "A" plan.
Finding food animal veterinarians
By Veterinary Economics Staff
Study data shows that for every 100 job openings, only 96 veterinarians will be ready to fill the spots.
What a new grad wants
By Veterinary Economics Staff
It's not that different from what established practitioners want. We probed to learn what type of practice future veterinarians want to join, what they see as their greatest strengths, weaknesses, and fears.
Cover story
Communicating the cost of pets
By Veterinary Economics Staff
Ward off potential problems by talking about pet costs in advance.
Giving older pets complete care
By Veterinary Economics Staff
With National Pet Wellness Month around the corner, it's a great time to evaluate how you educate clients about older pets' needs.
Client education on limited time
By Veterinary Economics Staff
You're pressed for time, but don't shortchange clients by skipping out on educational opportunities.
Managing Smart
Investigating the competitive landscape
By Veterinary Economics Staff
Half of veterinarians surveyed think their facilities and medical equipment are better than the other practices in their area. But how do they really know?
Waste not, want not
By Veterinary Economics Staff
With just two hands—and so many hours in a day—delegating tasks that don't require a DVM makes sense. Yet our study shows doctors spend several hours each week performing tasks they could pass on.
Does yellow mean more green?
By Veterinary Economics Staff
Twenty-seven percent of respondents to our survey say yellow page ads rank among their most effective marketing tools. But that's not enough to bank on.
Time for a meeting
By Veterinary Economics Staff
28% of Well-Managed Practices hold weekly staff meetings.
Assessing alternative remedies
By Veterinary Economics Staff
Today more of your clients dabble in herbal remedies and nutritional supplements. Are pets, and the veterinary practices that treat them, following the trend?
Personnel Solutions
Reality check: the true cost of living
By Veterinary Economics Staff
Salaries make up a big chunk of your total expenses, but when team members cover their basic living expenses, there may not be much left.
Does your revenue carry your team?
By Veterinary Economics Staff
Spend too much on wages and you could face financial trouble. Spend too little ... and well ... you get what you pay for. Use these guidelines to make sure you land on the middle ground.
Why staff members quit
By Veterinary Economics Staff
When a staff member leaves, it's more than just an inconvenience. In fact, Well-Managed Practices estimate it costs them $22,360 on average when an employee leaves, says Cynthia Wutchiett, CPA.
Perfecting team pay
By Veterinary Economics Staff
Are you paying your team too little, too much, or just about right given your location and their experience?
Make it rewarding
By Veterinary Economics Staff
To keep happy, high-quality employees, you need to show great team members that you appreciate their contributions. Would your rewards get rave reviews?
Practice Finances
To sell or not to sell
By Veterinary Economics Staff
Maintaining a retail area requires time, effort, and most of all, space. Is the investment worthwhile?
Connected clients spend more dough
By Veterinary Economics Staff
You want satisfied clients, of course. But pet owners who are emotionally plugged-in are better yet. Why? The strong relationship should mean that they accept more recommendations and refer more new business.
Wellness care falls short
By Veterinary Economics Staff
The message isn't new—pets are still missing basic care. This updated data shows how the issue affects your bottom line.

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