VETERINARY ECONOMICS, Nov 1, 2006 - Veterinary Economics
  • SEARCH:
Veterinary Economics

ADVERTISEMENT

VETERINARY ECONOMICS, Nov 1, 2006
Cover Story
If you pay peanuts, you get monkeys
By Denise Tumblin, CPA
You get what you pay for, so it should be no surprise that paying peanuts yields less-qualified, more-likely-to-be-unhappy employees—and high turnover.
You do what else?
Kick up your heels
Dancing keeps this veterinarian on her toes.
Hospital Design
Everything's bigger in Texas
By Amanda Bertholf
A large group of owners pooled money over a long period of time to build the Emergency Animal Clinic of Collin County, serving four cities.
Practice Tips
Use your voicemail
By Mark Opperman, CVPM
Five pluses to to using your voicemail to get the right messages to the right people in a timely manner.
True or false? Take this compensation quiz
By Bob Levoy
Complete this quiz—and size up your salary smarts.
Coping with credit cards
By Jeff Rothstein, DVM, MBA
Yes, credit cards make it easier for clients to pay. But the costs add up. Use these tips to balance the fees and turn credit card use to your benefit.
Practice Management Q&A
Internet ratings gone awry
By Linda Wasche
Q: How do I counteract poor reviews of my clinic on the Internet?
Building for lease
By Tom McFerson, CPA, ABV
Q: Are there any guidelines for leasing my building after selling the practice?
Keep the lines open
By Sheila Grosdidier, RVT
Q: How many incoming phone lines does my practice need for each veterinarian?
Equine Solutions
The Balancing Act
By Elizabeth Trotta
Achieving life balance isn't easy. Changing your approach requires trust and commitment.
Just in the nick of time
By Jessica Harper
You need the right inventory, in the right place, at the right time. These 8 experts give concrete strategies to help you achieve that goal.
Personnel Solutions
Three strikes you're out!
By Mark Opperman, CVPM
No one likes to fire people. But if you don't get rid of that problem employee, you're putting the good ones at risk. Take this approach to make this necessary evil as painless as possible.
Vetcetera
Straight from the horse's mouth
Scientists are analyzing horse vocalizations to determine how stress is communicated when horses whinny.
Cats that don't cause sniffles
For $3,950 per kitten, people with feline allergies can own one of the world's first scientifically proven hypoallergenic cats.
Expanding education knows no borders
The AVMA has done away with geographical boundaries for accredited technician programs between the United States and Canada.
Are you your own worst enemy?
It's widely known that women make less money than men do for performing the same job, and now a new study confirms previous findings: Female veterinarians tend to charge needier clients less than they charge the well-to-do ones.
Talking Points
6 ways to make Thanksgiving memorable
By Craig Woloshyn, DVM
Show respect for your clients, your profession, your family, and yourself over the holidays—leave work at work.
Hot Button
Dress the part
If you want to be treated like a doctor, you need to dress like one. No, flip-flops aren't acceptable.
Legal Ease
ADA compliance
By Phil Seibert, CVT
Make sure your goods and services are available to handicapped pet owners.
Veterinarians behaving badly
Murder, animal cruelty and pointing guns --check out misbehaving animal docs.
Checking in
Is your manager trapped?
By Marnette Denell Falley
It's uncomfortable for managers to be wedged in between you docs, who want things done your way -- the right way -- and a team that thinks the manager should have the influence and authority to rein you in. Here are some ways you get your manager tied in knots:
Growth Center
Lecture series improves dental care and compliance
Teaching proper dental care is part of the program at a Minnesota animal hospital. And co-owners Drs. Katherine Knutson and Stephen Barghusen aren't just teaching their staff.
Puppy parties bond patients to practice
Dogs can't wait to get through the front door of Chanhassen Veterinary Clinic in Chanhassen, Minn. For 12 years, the clinic has been throwing free puppy parties in its reception area.
Managing Smart
10 reasons to test in house
By Fred Metzger, DVM, DABVP
Are your in-house testing analyzers doing a better job gathering dust than guiding your diagnoses? Blow off the cobwebs and put your in-house testing tools to work.
Don't make me defend you
By Elizabeth Trotta
"Bad things happen. Animals die. Surgeries don't go as planned," says Bonnie Lutz, JD, an associate with Klinedinst Attorneys at Law in Orange County, Calif. "But that's not why veterinarians get sued."
Editors' Insights
Career Girls? Give me a break
By Amanda Bertholf
Men: Don't marry a woman with a career because you'll run a higher risk of having marital problems (read: divorce).
Products
Automatic doors
Automatic sliding doors to the kennel areas are on finely adjusted motion sensors mounted at the side of the door and come equipped with manual overrides. The surgical suites are also equipped with sliding doors so team members can move animals in and out easily, whether they're carrying the pet or using a gurney.

Photo by Ralph A. Thibodeau

The Emergency Animal Clinic of Collin County in Plano, Texas
Cabinets built tough
Equipped with a lift table and mahogany-color oak cabinets (which are used throughout the clinic), this room is functional yet has an appealing look. The color palette throughout the hospital accentuates the cabinetry and creates a warm and inviting atmosphere without being too trendy or dated. And architect Ralph Thibodeau says the nice-looking cabinets are built tough. All cabinets are finished with two coats of polyurethane wash and topped with plastic laminate countertops and backsplashes for durability. Walls in heavy-traffic areas, like the exam rooms, feature commercial grade, washable vinyl coverings.

Photo by Ralph A. Thibodeau

The Emergency Animal Clinic of Collin County in Plano, Texas
Cages on the edge
To keep sick patients visible, the main treatment area includes cages arranged around the periphery. When the emergency center is open, multiple emergency procedures are under way at one time, and the animals require close monitoring. The specialty veterinary group also uses this space during the day for procedures and surgical recovery. The treatment area lies adjacent to the lab and pharmacy for easy access to diagnostic equipment and drugs. Once an animal is stable, it's moved to the stable recovery areas in kennels "B" or "C."

Photo by Ralph A. Thibodeau

The Emergency Animal Clinic of Collin County in Plano, Texas
Chemotherapy hood
An internal medicine specialist who uses the building has access to a chemotherapy hood for working with and disposing of chemotherapy drugs. The porcelain ceramic tile flooring has a solid color throughout the thickness of the tile so it won't wear down--sometimes an issue when manufacturers apply a finish only to the surface. The tile flooring was installed with epoxy grout, which repels moisture--a big plus when it comes to urine.

Photo by Ralph A. Thibodeau

The Emergency Animal Clinic of Collin County in Plano, Texas
Doctors' stations
Doctors and technicians use this dedicated space to complete paperwork, write notes, make phone calls, and access the network. The doctors' stations sit in a convenient, centrally located alcove near the treatment area and main exam room hallway so doctors are never far away if they're needed.

Photo by Ralph A. Thibodeau

The Emergency Animal Clinic of Collin County in Plano, Texas
The Emergency Animal Clinic of Collin County
Location exterior.

Photo by Ralph A. Thibodeau

The Emergency Animal Clinic of Collin County in Plano, Texas

ADVERTISEMENT

Click here