VETERINARY ECONOMICS, Oct 1, 2007 - Veterinary Economics
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS, Oct 1, 2007
Vetcetera
Behind on sleep? Pay it forward
You really can make up lost sleep, according to research published in a recent issue of Harvard Women's Health Watch.
A dog's $12 million trust fund
Leona Helmsley, the billionaire hotel and real estate mogul who served prison time for tax evasion and other crimes, recently left $50 million to loved ones—$12 million of which went to her 8-year-old Maltese, Trouble.
Black Labs vs. pirates
Two dogs make quick work of DVD-copying bootleggers.
Photogenic felines
Photos of a new feline breed and a cat with braces.
Growth Center
Use seniors to make calls
Dr. Steve Bishop needed a strategy for reminding his clients when their pets were overdue for exams or treatments. It freed up receptionists, cost less, and could be done with flexible hours.
Fluid pumps it up
"We couldn't practice medicine properly without fluid pumps," says Dr. Robert Esplin, owner of Sylvania Veterinary Hospital in Sylvania, Ohio.
Checking in
Facing your fears
By Marnette Denell Falley
Most people are more afraid of public speaking than they are of death. But you also need to share your ideas and know-how with the world.
Hospital Design
A gutted building finds new life
By Amanda Bertholf
This California practice turned warehouse-sized space into wow.
Practice Tips
Caught in the act
By Nancy Allen
A grouchy client leaves the practice with a smile on her face. A co-worker finishes inventory 10 minutes earlier because you offered a helping hand. Those may seem like small accomplishments, but Nancy Allen, practice manager at Olathe Animal Hospital in Olathe, Kan., says these efforts deserve a thanks.
Sink your teeth into year-round dental care
By Andrew Rollo, DVM
Dental care is an everyday endeavor.
The power of celebration
By Bob Levoy
"Celebrating makes people feel like winners and creates an atmosphere of recognition and positive energy." ... say Jack and Suzy Welch, co-authors of Winning (Collins, 2005).
Practice Management Q&A
Abuse sick time and lose it
By Jan Miller
What can I do to get my employees to stop abusing sick days and show up to work on time?
Discontinuing discounts
By Karen E. Felsted, DVM, CPA, CVPM, MS
I'm negotiating the purchase of the practice where I'm employed. The current owner gives discounts to almost everyone—senior citizens, shelters, friends, and clients with multiple pets. How do I reduce the amount of services being given away without alienating a large number of clients?
Equine Solutions
Marketing to the masses
A lot of practitioners get outflanked by the increasing nemesis of competition.
Your bad-attitude team
By Amanda Bertholf
When team members go from rolling with the punches to rolling their eyes, don't ignore it.
You do what else?
Spinning in her spare time
By Wendy King, DVM
Last year my husband opened a state-of-the-art fitness facility. He needed candidates for a group-cycling certification program and still had a vacant spot on the day of training. As co-owner of the gym, I felt obligated to fill the seat—literally.
Practice Growth
Promoting twice-yearly wellness exams
By Michael Rehm, DVM
This preventive care program increases client bonding and extends pets' lives.
Hot Button
A crime that shocked the nation
By Patty Khuly, DVM, MBA
Why did this NFL quarterback throw it all away for a betting blood sport? He didn't bet on our outrage.
Legal Ease
Robbery prevention tactic No. 12: trained attack cat
By Phil Seibert, CVT
Take these steps to protect your practice and your team from thieves.
Microchip morality
By Karl Salzsieder, DVM, JD
If a client shows up with a stray but doesn't want it scanned for a microchip, am I legally required or legally forbidden to scan the pet or contact the chip registrant?
Click & Copy
Inactive-client letter
A customizable communication tool for pet owners you haven't seen in a while.
Reactivate your inactive clients
Renew those old relationships with a well-crafted letter to inactive clients.
Personnel Solutions
Employee motivation inventory
By Bob Levoy
Learn what makes team members tick with this form.
The rules of team retention
By Bob Levoy
You can sense whether employees are happy in an office the moment you walk in the front door. The most noticeable characteristic is the level of energy and emotional commitment that employees exhibit. Even a casual observer can feel the difference when walking the halls.
Cover Story
Comparing your fees to Well-Managed Practices'
By Denise Tumblin, CPA
Compare your value-based fees with Well-Managed Practices'.
Conducting a community survey
By Denise Tumblin, CPA
Use this tool from Benchmarks 2007 to gather information about other practices in your area.
Don't believe everything you hear about fees
By Denise Tumblin, CPA
It's time to reconsider these myths and misconceptions about pricing.
Client handout: What is a wellness screen?
By Michael Rehm, DVM
Give this handout to clients whose pets are due for a blood test.
Products
Advanced critical care
Wards located behind glass walls make it easy for the team to keep an eye on patients.

Photo by Glenn Cormier/Ben Carufel; Insite Architectural Photography

City of Angels Veterinary Specialty Center, Culver City, Calif.
Bricks and chairs
An interior brick wall with a window provides lines of sight into a client area with a coffee bar and vending machine.

Photo by Glenn Cormier/Ben Carufel; Insite Architectural Photography

City of Angels Veterinary Specialty Center, Culver City, Calif.
Curb appeal
The City of Angels facility is located in a modern, industrial area, and the owners wanted to retain some of that look to ensure that the building would fit in with the rest of the neighborhood. Metal, brick, and wood elements accent the building, where clients park on the rooftop and descend into a courtyard near the main entrance.

Photo by Glenn Cormier/Ben Carufel; Insite Architectural Photography

City of Angels Veterinary Specialty Center, Culver City, Calif.
Eye Care for Animals
Quality lighting made the high-priority list in the whole facility. Good lighting makes it easier to practice excellent medicine. The designers planned exterior windows to provide natural light where it was most needed, as you can see in this ophthalmic surgery suite. The laminate countertops and cabinets are easy to clean.

Photo by Glenn Cormier/Ben Carufel; Insite Architectural Photography

City of Angels Veterinary Specialty Center, Culver City, Calif.
Interfaced carpet tile
The three doctors' offices located throughout the facility feature interfaced carpet tile. Overhead cabinets provide extra storage.

Photo by Glenn Cormier/Ben Carufel; Insite Architectural Photography

City of Angels Veterinary Specialty Center, Culver City, Calif.
Keep it clean
The challenge in the courtyard near the main entrance is making sure the artificial grass stays clean and odor free, Dr. Mona Rosenberg says. The oncoloy practice alone sees about 800 patients a month.

Photo by Glenn Cormier/Ben Carufel; Insite Architectural Photography

City of Angels Veterinary Specialty Center, Culver City, Calif.
Off the wall
Black-and-white photos of the doctors with their pets grace the walls of the specialty center.

Photo by Glenn Cormier/Ben Carufel; Insite Architectural Photography

City of Angels Veterinary Specialty Center, Culver City, Calif.
Plastic laminate
The countertops in the reception and treatment areas are durable plastic laminate. Transaction surfaces at the reception counters are solid concrete surfaces with steel edge banding.

Photo by Glenn Cormier/Ben Carufel; Insite Architectural Photography

City of Angels Veterinary Specialty Center, Culver City, Calif.
Plastic laminate in treatment area
The countertops in the reception and treatment areas are durable plastic laminate.

Photo by Glenn Cormier/Ben Carufel; Insite Architectural Photography

City of Angels Veterinary Specialty Center, Culver City, Calif.
Sculptures
Sculptures at City of Angels Veterinary Specialty Center add an interesting visual element. Artificial grass means there are never any brown patches, but Dr. Mona Rosenberg does have a team member patrol and hose down the area daily.

Photo by Glenn Cormier/Ben Carufel; Insite Architectural Photography

City of Angels Veterinary Specialty Center, Culver City, Calif.
Sealed concrete floors
The reception area for the oncology and eye care centers features sealed concrete floors that were treated with a slip-resistant top coat.

Photo by Glenn Cormier/Ben Carufel; Insite Architectural Photography

City of Angels Veterinary Specialty Center, Culver City, Calif.
Southern California Veterinary Imaging
In this exam room, modern art gives clients somthing interesting to look at and adds a pop of color to a neutral wall. The raised countertop for the computer makes typing easy, and a 12-inch backsplash on the countertop keeps chemicals from splashing onto the paint. Lightweight and easy-to-move seating allows the medical team and clients to improvise the room's arrangement when needed.

Photo by Glenn Cormier/Ben Carufel; Insite Architectural Photography

City of Angels Veterinary Specialty Center, Culver City, Calif.
Treatment areas with laminate
The countertops in the treatment areas are durable plastic laminate.

Photo by Glenn Cormier/Ben Carufel; Insite Architectural Photography

City of Angels Veterinary Specialty Center, Culver City, Calif.
Veterinary Cancer Group
The reception area for the oncology and eye care centers features sealed concrete floors that were treated with a slip-resistant top coat. The practices chose sealed concrete for most other areas of the facility except surgery and the doctors' offices.

Photo by Glenn Cormier/Ben Carufel; Insite Architectural Photography

City of Angels Veterinary Specialty Center, Culver City, Calif.

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