VETERINARY ECONOMICS, Feb 1, 2008 - Veterinary Economics
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS, Feb 1, 2008
Cover Story
Strength of heart
By Ernest Ward Jr., DVM
You're the heart of your hospital. Making changes to get fit, eat healthy, and work smart will take courage and resolve, but we know you've got it in you.
Practice Tips
Three cheers for the team
By Kathy Estrada, LVT
Here are three ways we recognize our team members' efforts at Michigan Veterinary Specialists
Are your clients annoyed?
By Bob Levoy
It's probably hard to believe there's anything about your practice that irritates your clients that you don't already know about. But consider this recently discovered problem at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. It started with a survey that hospital administrators gave to patients when they were sent home from the hospital.
Don't count on deducting life insurance costs
By Gary Glassman, CPA
If you practice with partners, your buy-sell agreement is an important way to develop a plan to purchase an owner's interest under a variety of circumstances and to protect your own interest in those same circumstances—one of which is the death of a partner.
A two-part strategy for encouraging dental care
By Scott Linick, DVM, FAVD
February is National Dental Health Month, putting the annual spotlight on dental care. But Dr. Scott Linick, FAVD, owner of Plainfield Animal Hospital in South Plainfield, N.J., knows the importance of dental care, and not just during Dental Health Month. He uses two methods for encouraging clients to take better care of their pets' teeth year round.
Practice Management Q&A
Charging the groomer rent
By Karen E. Felsted, DVM, CPA, CVPM, MS
Q. I'm opening a veterinary practice with grooming services. The groomer wants to lease a room monthly, but I'm not sure how much to charge for rent. Do I charge base rent plus a percentage of her production?
Spreading around the management duties
By Sheila Grosdidier, RVT
Q. We employ a bookkeeper, a head technician, and an inventory manager who all share some of the management duties at my practice. I perform about four days' worth of management tasks a month. My partner and I are looking at a tiered approach to compensation—management will be compensated at 3 percent to 4 percent of gross. What goes into this figure?
Ownership Issues
The worst-case scenario survival handbook: Veterinary edition
By Mark Opperman, CVPM
Hurricanes. Embezzlers. Lawsuits. If you put the proper safeguards in place, you can stay out of trouble.
Hot Button
Under one roof
By Amanda Bertholf
This hospital in Panama City Beach, Fla., finds one home for all its services.
I got the mixed-breed, money-wasting blues
By Melody Heath, DVM
What's your take on this doctor's take on "designer dogs"? Comment now online.
Click & Copy
Clients can trim pounds from pets
Weight loss is tough for anyone—two-legged or four-legged. However, weight loss can not only add years to a pet's life, it can also make those years more enjoyable. Helping your clients trim a few pounds off of their cuddly companions may be easier than you think. They just need to understand the process, pay attention to detail, and call on your assistance and that of your healthcare team.
Checking in
The curse of knowledge
By Marnette Denell Falley
More information, more experience, more skills—those are all good things, right? Actually, your know-how can sometimes work against you.
Equine Solutions
Is it ... legal, ethical, moral?
By James Guenther, DVM, MBA, MHA, CVPM, AVA
You probably got ethics training in school, but that's very different from the experience you get in practice, when you're actually facing the tough questions. You want to do what's right for the horse. You need to know the law, so you don't put your practice at risk. You sure don't want to pay fines or put your license on the line. How can you keep it all on the straight and narrow? Consider this article your refresher. Let's get ethical.

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