VETERINARY ECONOMICS, Jul 1, 2006 - Veterinary Economics
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS, Jul 1, 2006
Checking in
Get away from it all
By Marnette Denell Falley
Want to love your job 10 years from now? A little time away could make the critical difference.
Vetcetera
9-11 rescue dogs cancer-free
Twelve search-and-rescue dogs that had their noses buried deep in the rubble at Ground Zero are cancer-free despite exposure to hazardous carcinogens and fine particles of soot.
School of fish
With demand for veterinary care of farm fish and pet fish on the rise, the nation's first fish certification program is now available online.
The best job in America
Where does the job of veterinarian rank among a list of top 50 jobs when comparing stress levels, schedule flexibility, and working environments? The job squeaks in at No. 49, nestled between sales engineer (No. 48) and school administrator (No. 50).
Practice Mangement Q & A
Production deductions
By Mark Opperman, CVPM
We currently subtract the cost of inventory from our doctors' production. Do you recommend this? Also, should we subtract payroll taxes?
To merge—or not to merge
By Lorraine Monheiser List
What are the possible pros and cons of merging two practices?
Minimizing owner taxes
By Gary Glassman, CPA
We'd like to keep our salaries low in order to minimize Social Security and Medicare Taxes. What's the minimum salary we can take so the IRS isn't breathing down our necks?
Start me up
By Tom McFerson, CPA, ABV
I'm opening a new practice. Is a conventional loan better than a capital lease?
A team of 10s
By Joel Parker, DVM
How can I find good staff members?
Practice Tips
Sneaky charges bite
By Lynette Ott
If your credit card statements are rife with odd or inexplicable charges, a few simple changes could help you save.
Do your raises keep up with the times?
By Lauren Diamond
The cost of living creeps up and up. Does team members' pay keep pace?
Building the Bond
Develop a euthanasia protocol
Use these tips to manage euthanasia visits more effectively and show clients you care.
About a dog
By Ronald Stone, DVM
One doctor talks about the patient that was hardest to lose.
Legal Ease
Keeping your secrets under wraps
By Phil Seibert, CVT
You don't want your staff members sharing private practice information. Confidentiality agreements lay down the law—and keep your secrets from slipping out.
14 bits of payroll data to keep
You know there's more to paying team members than cutting a check. But are you sure you're keeping the right records?
Maine law protects pets in domestic violence cases
National studies on victims of domestic violence show that abusers have threatened to harm or kill, or have actually harmed their pets as a means of keeping the victim from leaving the relationship, said Maine's Governor John Baldacci, as reported in The New York Times.
Unsupervised ordering raises ethical questions
By Charlotte Lacroix, DVM, JD
My manager and associate order equine products through my veterinary practice. Is this legal, since I don't treat horses?
Kansas funds students interested in large animal practice
Kansas recently passed a law that's designed to help bring students to large animal practice. It establishes the Veterinary Training Program for Rural Kansas at Kansas State University's College of Veterinary Medicine, which supports five students each year.
Click & Copy
Handout: Parasites at a glance
Remind clients that parasite control keeps pets—and people—healthy. Then use handouts like this one as a follow-up to your exam room message.
3 tips for talking about parasites
Is your message about the risks of parasites reaching clients?
Cover Story
Map the path to better care
By Mary Ann Vande Linde, DVM
When you, your team, and your clients are reading from the same set of directions, you make it to your end goal—better pet care—with fewer detours.
3 steps to internal compliance
By Jessica Harper
Agree on the basic care you want to deliver at your veterinary hospital. Write it down. And get all your team members heading in the same direction.
Sample standards to get you started
Your standards should be clear, concise protocols—like the ones listed below—for what you believe is the best care for the pets you see.
Professional Growth
Cross-training for work & life
By Philip VanVranken, DVM , Andrew Rollo, DVM
You cover a lot of ground everyday, leaping personal and professional hurdles. Balance and practice will help you tread diverse terrain and become more than a well-rounded doctor—you'll be a well-rounded person.
Practice Finances
When to go out on a limb
By Mark Opperman, CVPM
You don't have to avoid accounts receivable altogether—just be smart about when to offer credit and who you offer it to.
Hospital Design
Deep in the heart of Texas
By Amanda Bertholf
A facility that includes regional architectural elements and projects warmth and southern hospitality, Crossroads Animal Clinic in Houston is an example of what you can achieve with design.
Cover story
Quit waiting around for no-shows
By Elizabeth Trotta
19 tips to cut back on no-shows and get back to business.
Industry Issues
Issues that drive associates bananas
By Karen Wheeler, DVM
Owners and associates, you can see eye to eye. Just get the monkeys off your back.
Equine Solutions
If you market, they will come
By Jessica Harper
The key to attracting a crowd: Knowing what your clients want and raising your level of service to meet their needs. Then you can tap marketing tactics to spread the word.
Options for your marketing plan
After researching your customers, you'll be ready to set a marketing plan that fits your practice's needs
Hot Button
Step up your technology
By Dave Roos, DVM
Don't you want to improve efficiency, communication, and revenue? If you're not using electronic medical records, you're losing out on these opportunities.
Products
Atrium
Natural light filters through the skylights in the 12-foot ceiling to accent the space. A large fountain, plants, and patio-type seating give clients a cozy place to sit.

Photo by Bruce Glass, Bruce Glass Commercial Photography

Crossroads Animal Clinic in Houston
Built-in benches
Built-in benches provide space-efficient seating for clients. The small windows allow team members easy visibility without disrupting the exam in progress.

Photo by Bruce Glass, Bruce Glass Commercial Photography

Crossroads Animal Clinic in Houston
Hidden callback stations
Four transaction workstations make it easy to interact with clients and two callback stations are hidden from public view. Twelve-foot ceilings add height and dimension to the room, and the wood elements match the exterior.

Photo by Bruce Glass, Bruce Glass Commercial Photography

Crossroads Animal Clinic in Houston
Near atrium
Two surgery tables allow for enough space in the suite to accomodate the needed support equipment. The suite is adjacent to the atrium where clients can wait while their pet is being operated on.

Photo by Bruce Glass, Bruce Glass Commercial Photography

Crossroads Animal Clinic in Houston
T-shaped islands
The double T-shaped islands are used for both exams and treatment. Recovery cages, dog and cat wards, callback stations, and support equipment sit on the perimeter.

Photo by Bruce Glass, Bruce Glass Commercial Photography

Crossroads Animal Clinic in Houston
Texas-style look
A metal roof and natural-colored Austin stone give the building a Texas-style look. The covered porch allows easy access to the entrance.

Photo by Bruce Glass, Bruce Glass Commercial Photography

Crossroads Animal Clinic in Houston
U-shaped
The U-shaped area features an island workstation for callbacks. The lab and pharmacy are visible from the treatment area.

Photo by Bruce Glass, Bruce Glass Commercial Photography

Crossroads Animal Clinic in Houston

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