Veterinary Medicine Essentials: Cognitive dysfunction

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Veterinary Medicine Essentials: Cognitive dysfunction

Each Veterinary Medicine Essentials package covers diagnostic steps, treatment plan guidance and the latest updates, plus resources to share with your entire veterinary team and your clients.
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Jun 15, 2017
By dvm360.com staff

Disorientation. Inappropriate elimination. Changes in sleep. Excessive vocalization. All of these are signs of cognitive dysfunction syndrome, a condition commonly affecting senior pets. However, just because it is not unusual doesn’t mean it is normal aging. With the right diet, medications, and enrichment activities, we can slow down the cognitive decline that these pets experience—and possibly even reverse it. Find out how with this collection of articles on helping affected patients.

 

Updates on cognitive dysfunction

Don't draw a blank when it comes to dementia

Sep 30, 2016

Many of your older canine and feline veterinary patients are likely showing signs of cognitive decline. Have you been checking up on this treatable condition? ...

 

Think it's dementia? Remember DISHA

Aug 03, 2016

This handy abbreviation will help you pinpoint true cases of cognitive dysfunction in your veterinary patients. ...

 

New review helps illuminate cognitive dysfunction syndrome

Aug 01, 2016

Without cold, hard lab numbers and clear scientific proof, diagnosing neurologic conditions in your veterinary patients can be tough to describe, and without owner buy-in, they can be tough to treat. However, a recent review provides a starting point for providing clients with objective evidence. ...

 

Just Ask the Expert: The nightmare of the midnight serenade

Mar 15, 2016

A little night music is not so pretty when it's coming from your kitty—and you're trying to sleep. Here's how to help clients curtail the caterwauling. ...

Diagnosing cognitive dysfunction

Putting memory to the test

The delayed non-matching-to-position task can help assess a dog's ability to learn and remember. ...

 

Enriching geriatric patients' lives (Proceedings)

An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior. ...

 

Managing common behavioral problems in old dogs and cats (Proceedings)

Definite personality changes and behavioral problems can be extremely challenging to the practitioner and extremely frustrating to the client. Some problems are mild and acceptable, while others are major concerns initiating euthanasia discussions. General behavioral changes are elderly patient's desire more attention, are more jealous, are more irritable, are less mentally alert, and have altered sleep cycles. ...

 

Successful brain aging in dogs

Contributions, causes of age-related cognitive changes in dogs. ...

 

Do dogs with cognitive dysfunction also have neurologic abnormalities?

Cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS) in dogs is thought to be similar to Alzheimer's disease in people. And studies have revealed that people with Alzheimer's disease not only have cognitive deficits, but neurologic deficits as well, such as impaired gait, restlessness, slowness, and, rarely, tremors. ...

Preventing and treating cognitive dysfunction

Boosting canine cognition

Researchers explore the link between nutritional intervention and behavioral enrichment to ward off cognitive decline in aging dogs. ...

 

Spotlight on Research: Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome (Sponsored by Virbac Animal Health)

Pets are living longer. As a consequence, the population of dogs and cats developing signs of senility is growing. ...

 

Brain aging in dogs: Prevention and treatment: Second of a two-part series

Diet, supplements, drugs and cognitive and physical stimulation all play roles. ...

 

Preventing and treating cognitive dysfunction in senior pets (Proceedings)

Even if a medical problem is diagnosed it can be a challenge to determine whether the problem is causing or contributing to the signs in which case a therapeutic trial might prove useful. ...

 

S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) and cognitive dysfunction in dogs (Sponsored by Virbac Animal Health)

Expert discussion on cognitive dysfunction syndrome and therapy options, including S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) ...

Associated conditions

Age is not a disease ...

... but here are client communication and philosophical tips from CVC educator Sue Ettinger, DVM, DACVIM (oncology), for those moments in a veterinary hospital when a pet's age and difficult diagnoses and prognoses come together. ...

 

Rapamycin: A real fountain of youth?

Not so fast, says a leader of the Dog Aging Project who is researching this new compound touted as extending life. It's all about better health! ...

 

Video: Lose the "old age" mindset about aging pets

Don't attribute clinical signs in aging cats and dogs to old age alone, says Susan Little, DVM, DABVP. ...

Educating clients about cognitive dysfunction

Posts and tweets about cognitive dysfunction in dogs and cats

Your veterinary clients likely won't volunteer that they're seeing signs of this disease in their senior pets, so make sure you're asking and educating with this social media campaign. ...

 

Wellness screens for senior pets

Raise your veterinary clients' awareness of important changes their older pet may be experiencing. ...

 

Pets, clients and senior moments

Seeing more senior pets? That's great. But it's important to teach clients to be on the lookout for signs of aging and corresponding behavioral changes. ...

 

Keep track of behavioral changes in senior pets

As pets age, their brains can slow down, too. Intervene early to give dogs and cats the best chance of staying sharp—and you'll help keep clients happy. ...