Veterinary Medicine Essentials: Squamous cell carcinoma

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Veterinary Medicine Essentials: Squamous cell carcinoma

Each Veterinary Medicine Essentials package covers diagnostic steps, treatment plan guidance and the latest updates, plus resources to share with your entire veterinary team and your clients.
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Jun 28, 2017
By dvm360.com staff

The most common malignant oral tumor in cats—and common in dogs too. Do you know the latest on detecting and treating SCC in your patients and talking with clients about it? Here are our best articles to help you catch this rapidly growing cancer early and what to do if you do.

 
 
 

Diagosing squamous cell carcinoma

Squamous cell carcinoma in cats: Early detection is best

Dr. Sue Ettinger says treatment options aren't great, so watch for these oral tumors early on. ...

 

Open up and say "... oh no ...": Guidance on oral tumors in veterinary patients

A big bonus of a thorough veterinary oral examination: You can spot oral tumors as well. The downside: You may spot an oral tumor. ...

 

Open wide: Seize your opportunity to spot oral tumors

A thorough veterinary dental examination is your chance to catch these distressing eruptions early. ...

 

Canine and feline oral tumors: Earlier is better

Oral tumors are the fourth most common cancer in dogs and represent 6 percent of all canine cancers. The most common malignant tumors in dogs are melanoma, fibrosarcoma, SCC and osteosarcoma. Benign tumors include the epulides (ossifying, fibromatous and acanthomatous) and other odontogenic tumors. In cats, oral tumors make up 3 percent of all feline cancers. SCC is the most common malignant tumor followed by fibrosarcoma. Benign oral tumors are much less common in cats. ...

 

2 tips for better oral tumor biopsies

CVC educator Barden Greenfield, DVM, DAVDC, shared a lot of advice about oral tumor types, diagnosis and treatment in a recent session. Here are two tips that stood out to one interested attendee. ...

Treating squamous cell carcinoma

Get armed to the teeth about veterinary oral tumors

That dreaded moment when you peer into a patient's mouth and see what might be a tumor. Have the following questions been on the tip of your tongue? We've got the answers from veterinary oncologist Dr. Laura Garrett. ...

 

Intracavitary and intralesional chemotherapy in dogs and cats

In well-selected cases, these localized chemotherapies have shown promise. ...

 

Oral squamous cell carcinoma in cats

Tips for catching this invasive neoplasia as early as possible. ...

 

Finding and treating oral melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and fibrosarcoma in dogs

Your defensive tools include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy. ...

 

Prognostic factors and complications associated with surgery for oral tumors

Tumor location and completeness of excision are significantly associated with survival time in dogs with oral tumors treated surgically, regardless of histologic type. ...

 

Feline oral squamous cell carcinoma: An overview

The oral cavity is a common site for neoplasia in cats, accounting for about 10% of all feline tumors. ...

 

AAHA publishes guidelines on managing cancer in dogs and cats

The new oncology guidelines will help ensure veterinary patients benefit from the correct diagnosis and optimal treatment to maintain the best quality of life possible. ...

Client education

Client handout: FAQ about chemotherapy in pets

Provide this handout to prepare veterinary clients for what they may face when their pets receive cancer treatment. ...

 

Client handout: Helping a pet through chemo at home

Guide veterinary clients through the chemotherapy process using this helpful tool. ...

Arming your team

“Stop talking!" Pet owner communication fails

Veterinary cancer specialist Dr. Sue Ettinger has learned the hard way that client communication isn't one-size-fits-all. ...

 

Delivering a cancer diagnosis: Check perception first

If you don’t take the time to learn your clients’ perceptions about cancer, you’re skipping a step. In this audio clip from a recent CVC session, veterinary cancer specialist Sue Ettinger explains how to give your clients an opportunity to share what they know, what they expect and what they want. ...

 

Veterinary team members are crucial for cancer care

When it comes to cancer care in the clinic, Dr. Sue Ettinger says, "Team members are as important as I am as the doctor." ...

 

First things first: Earn cancer clients' trust

Build a bond to weather tough times. ...

 

Dig deep to help pets with cancer at your veterinary practice

Use these seven tips to offer support for pet owners when they face the pressure of a beloved pet's cancer diagnosis. ...