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Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Mastitis control: do the old ways still work? (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The development and effectiveness of the standard milking time hygiene practices and dry cow therapy were established in the 1960's. Because of the effectiveness of these practices, mastitis has evolved on many farms to primarily environmental rather than contagious pathogens. The purpose of this article is to perform a literature review (especially trying to find studies published after the year 2000) as to the effectiveness of the various mastitis control practices in today's progressive dairy farm.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Farm animal problem solving (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The majority of food animal veterinarians do their best to make the most appropriate decisions for their clients' livestock. But there are times when we simply don't know what the best decision is. Likewise, there are times when a "new" procedure or "new" product is suggested by the client or one of our colleagues that we are unaware of or have not tried. Problem solving requires the use of multiple sources to educate oneself about the particular problem.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Integrated BVD control plans for dairy operations (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

More than 60 years ago an enteric disease of cattle was described in North America that was characterized by outbreaks of diarrhea and erosive lesions of the digestive tract. The disease was called bovine viral diarrhea virus or BVD. The virus causing BVD was named bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV).

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Role of bovine viral diarrhea virus in feedlots (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is one of the most important infectious agents of cattle. The annual economic loss caused by BVDV is difficult to quantify but certainly is significant. The insidious nature of BVDV combined with the biology of the virus and complex disease pathogenesis has made control and prevention of this virus challenging.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Integrated BVD control plans for beef operations (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

More than 60 years ago an enteric disease of cattle was described in North America that was characterized by outbreaks of diarrhea and erosive lesions of the digestive tract.17 The disease was called bovine viral diarrhea virus or BVD. The virus causing BVD was named bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV).

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Clinical mastitis treatment efficacy: Are we making progress? (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Mastitis is considered one of the most costly diseases of dairy cattle and one of the most common reasons for antibiotic treatment on dairy farms. There are numerous treatments (both antibiotic and non-antibiotic) for clinical mastitis.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Rarer neurologic diseases of food animals (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

BSE is defined as a slow developing neurodegenerative disease of cattle that begins insidiously with subtle signs progressing to terminal recumbency. This is a cerebral disease thus signs are consistent with abnormal mentation. Slight changes in behavior include increased apprehension and tactile and auditory hyperesthesia.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The livestock-wildlife interface in infectious disease transmission — the bovine TB example in Michigan (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The issue of disease transmission between species is nothing new. Veterinarians have always been aware of the potential risk of wildlife being a source of disease transmission to livestock. A classic example is transmission of Leptospirosis species from wildlife to cattle via urine contamination of the environment.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Environmental role in the epidemiology, transmission and diagnosis of Johne's disease (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne's Disease (JD), is prevalent worldwide. The NAHMS Dairy 1996 study, estimated 21.6% of the dairy herds in the US were infected with MAP, resulting in annual economic losses for the dairy industry of $200-250 million.

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