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Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Case study: monensin (Rumensin) toxicity in dairy replacement heifers (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Many dairy producers use Rumensin? (Elanco Animal Health) in dairy heifers as an aid to controlling coccidiosis and for improved feed efficiency. Rumensin? also is approved for use in lactating cows as a tool for improving milk production efficiency. Monensin, the active compound in Rumensin?, has a very wide safety margin for humans and cattle. But, it can be toxic if not fed according to the FDA-approved label. In other species, such as horses, monensin can be extremely toxic.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Sick cria management: the Tennessee method (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Dealing with a sick cria and an anxious client can be quite daunting at times. This task becomes less daunting when one understands the main problems and how to manage them. Neonatal crias are typically admitted to the UT College of veterinary medicine due to prematurity/weakness/inability to stand, suspected or real failure of passive transfer (FPT), and septicemia.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Common neurological diseases in food animal (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Maybe this doesn't really fit "common" but it is always interesting to hear about cases. The main thing about rabies in cattle (and other species) is that signs are quite variable and inconsistent. Certain signs should be "red flags" for bovine rabies. Oftentimes cattle with rabies will have some history of hindlimb ataxia, weakness, or paralysis (this in itself is typical of many bovine diseases but for cattle exhibiting these signs, rabies should be considered).

Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE

Hard times in the heartland

September 16, 2010

Rural areas are clamoring for veterinarians, prompting universities and governments to find new ways to attract new blood to large-animal medicine. But what about rural practice is causing the shortage?

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Antimicrobial therapy: interpreting susceptibility results (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

The design of antimicrobial regimens is addressed in the next section in these proceedings, but the concepts within regimen design related to determining the concentration of drug required to inhibit growth of bacterial pathogens deserve a more thorough discussion.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Resistance challenges in veterinary medicine: Who's to blame for "superbugs" and how do we deal with them (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

This presentation attempts to summarize some of the major concerns in resistance development along with key articles explaining relevance, epidemiology, and prevalence. It is not intended to be an exhaustive review of the literature and the interested practitioner should use the cited literature herein as a basis for continued, extended reading.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

How do drugs move through the animal (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

In most cases, we administer drugs at a different site than we want to drug to act. Understanding how drugs get to their site of action and how long they stay there is essential to making therapeutic decisions about which drug, what route, how much, how often, and for how long.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Economic cost of BVD (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Suckling calves are commonly in contact with the breeding herd during early gestation, prior to the time the bovine fetus develops a competent immune system. As a result, PI suckling calves are considered to be the primary source of BVDV infection in breeding herds causing pregnancy loss, pre-weaning mortality and the induction of PI calves in the next generation.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Herd health management plans for cow/calf operations (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Developing herd health programs for cow-calf operations can be time consuming but rewarding for both the producer and the veterinarian if done appropriately. However, many producers think of a herd health program as only a vaccine program. Interestingly, the vaccination schedule and the vaccines that will be used constitute the smallest portion of a true herd health program.

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