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Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Heifer development—reproduction and nutrition (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Replacement heifer development is a critically important area for veterinarians to offer production medicine advice to their beef-producing clients. In order for replacement heifers to calve at approximately 24 months of age and to reach puberty the equivalent of three heat cycles before the start of the mature cow breeding season, heifers must become puberal by 11 to 13 months of age.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

How to evaluate drug information (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

One can usually find many sources of information about drugs: FDA website, drug company websites and technical reports, VIN, journals, trade magazines, and so on. The important skill required of veterinarians is to assess that information to determine its usefulness in your daily practice.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Selection and evaluation of beef heifers (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Productivity for beef cattle herds has been shown to be increased when a high percentage of heifers become pregnant early in the first breeding season. A producer's heifer selection and development program should result in most heifers in the replacement pool reaching puberty at least 42 days prior to the start of breeding because the conception success to first service is lower on the puberal estrus compared to the third estrus.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Targeting antimicrobials in food animals (part 2) (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

These proceedings present data related to the question of how long to wait after administering a single injection antimicrobial before applying success/failure criteria. More accurately, we will evaluate success/failure and mortality data based on administering a uniform regimen and then waiting different periods before applying success/failure criteria, and the animal subsequently being eligible for further therapy.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Anti-inflammatories and analgesics for cattle (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Drugs approved in the U.S. specifically for analgesia in cattle do not exist. There are guidance documents from the FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine for companies that would like to have an NSAID approved for pain relief

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

How do drugs work (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

The science of how drugs work on the body (or the microorganism or parasite) is pharmacodymanics (its counterpart being pharmacokinetics, how the body works on the drug). In this section, the basic concepts of drug concentration and drug action are followed by a review of the mechanisms of action of the major drug groups used in food animal practice including NSAIDs, glucocorticoids, reproductive drugs, antimicrobials, and parasiticides.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Biosecurity to control reproductive disease in beef cattle (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Pathogens differ in their virulence, contagiousness, and their modes of transmission. These differences exist not only between pathogens, but for virulence and contagiousness, can also differ between strains of the same species of pathogen.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Controlling internal parasites in cattle (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Although we have known the importance of internal parasites in cattle for many years, we still face an endless battle to control these organisms. Parasites are the ultimate "survivor". Parasites realize that their survival is dependent on not killing their host. As a result, they have adapted as their hosts (cattle) are exposed to different management practices (including parasiticide products and pasture management practices).

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Targeting antimicrobials in food animals (part 1) (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

This checklist serves as a starting point for evaluating your applications of antimicrobials in food animals.

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