Articles by Susan Little, DVM, DABVP (feline) - dvm360
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Articles by Susan Little, DVM, DABVP (feline)

Susan Little, DVM, DABVP (feline)


Articles
How to make your practice feline friendly (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

There is no question that feline medicine has grown steadily in popularity since the 1970s when the first feline-only practices were established.

Common inherited diseases of cats (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

The human genome is composed of about 3 billion base pairs, of which only about 2% forms coding DNA (genes); the rest is non-coding and serves various functions, such as gene regulation. Humans have about 20-25,000 genes, although the function of 50% of them is unknown.

Management of cats with urethral obstruction (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

It is helpful to divide cats with FLUTD into obstructive and non-obstructive uropathy for treatment purposes. Obstructive uropathy is most commonly seen in male cats due to the small diameter of the male urethra. Typical clinical signs include dysuria, hematuria, frequent attempts to urinate, and licking at the penis or prepuce.

Coughing cats: Asthma or heartworm? (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

The cat is considered a resistant, yet susceptible host for Dirofilaria immitis. Worm burdens are much lower in cats than in dogs (average 15 worms in dogs and 1-3 in cats in endemic areas) and about 1/3 of feline infections involve worms of the same sex. Feline heartworm (HW) was first described in the 1920s; awareness has increased greatly since the introduction of Heartgard for cats in 1997 and the associated marketing campaign. Feline HW remains a difficult to diagnose, yet fully preventable disease.

Common inherited diseases in cats (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

The human genome is composed of about 3 billion base pairs, of which only about 2% forms coding DNA (genes); the rest is non-coding and serves various functions, such as gene regulation. Humans have about 20-25,000 genes, although the function of 50% of them is unknown.

Diagnosing and managing idiopathic cystitis in cats (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

Feline idiopathic cystitis (FIC) is a sterile, inflammatory process causing signs of lower urinary tract disease (LUTD). It affects 1.5% of cats presented to primary care veterinarians.21 It is the most common diagnosis for young cats with LUTD (the second most common being urolithiasis).

Management of urethral obstruction in cats (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

Lower urinary tract disease in cats was described as early as 1925. Over the years, the terms "feline urologic syndrome" (FUS) and "feline lower urinary tract disease" (FLUTD) have been used to describe the group of clinical signs related to problems voiding. However, these descriptive terms do not identify the underlying etiology.

Managing calcium oxalate uroliths in cats (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

Struvite and calcium oxalate (CaOx) uroliths are the most commonly reported uroliths in cats. In the last 25 years, dramatic change in the prevalence of different urolith types has occurred. Until the mid-1980s, struvite uroliths made up 78% of submissions to the Minnesota Urolith Center (MUC).

Do cats get bacterial urinary tract infections (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

The normal feline lower urinary tract has a number of defence mechanisms against infection. These include normal micturition (e.g., frequent and complete voiding), normal anatomy (e.g., length of urethra), uroepithelial mucosal barriers, the antimicrobial properties of normal urine (e.g., high specific gravity and osmolality) and a normal immune system.

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