Dental Corner: Using intraoral regional anesthetic nerve blocks - Veterinary Medicine
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Dental Corner: Using intraoral regional anesthetic nerve blocks


VETERINARY MEDICINE


Palatine nerve block


Figure 6. The palatine nerve block. Local anesthetic is injected at a midpoint between the mesial aspect of the maxillary carnassial tooth and the palatal midline (arrows). One or both sides may be blocked simultaneously.
The palatine nerve block partially anesthetizes the maxillary incisors, canines, and premolars. This block is recommended in cats. Keep in mind that most of the innervation to the maxillary arch comes from the infraorbital nerve, and the palatine block only offers some degree of anesthesia. Thus in dogs, the palatine nerve block should be performed simultaneously with the infraorbital nerve block to offer the highest degree of analgesia. Inject 0.1 to 0.2 ml bupivacaine (0.5%) at a midpoint between the mesial aspect of the maxillary carnassial tooth and the palatal midline (Figure 6).

REFERENCES



1. Anthony, J.: Intraoral regional anesthetic nerve blocks. Proc. World Veterinary Dental Congress, World Veterinary Dental Congress, Vancouver, British Columbia, 1995; pp 56-57.

2. Lantz, G.C.: Regional anesthesia for dentistry and oral surgery. J. Vet. Dent. 20 (3):181-186; 2003.

3. Holmstrom, S.E. et al.: Regional and local anesthesia. Veterinary Dental Techniques, 3rd Ed. (S.E. Holmstrom et al., eds.). W.B. Saunders, Philadelphia, Pa., 2004; pp 625-636.

"Dental Corner" was contributed by Daniel T. Carmichael, DVM, DAVDC, The Center For Specialized Veterinary Care, 609-5 Cantiague Rock Road, Westbury, NY 11590.


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Source: VETERINARY MEDICINE,
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