Examining the pathogenesis of feline hyperthyroidism - Veterinary Medicine
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Examining the pathogenesis of feline hyperthyroidism
Here's what is known about the development of this endocrinopathy and a look at areas researchers are probing. Additional knowledge from studies such as these will allow us to improve therapies and someday prevent this disorder.


VETERINARY MEDICINE


REFERENCES

1. Martin, K.M. et al.: Evaluation of dietary and environmental risk factors for hyperthyroidism in cats. JAVMA 217 (6):853-856; 2000.

2. Kass, P.H. et al.: Evaluation of environmental, nutritional, and host factors in cats with hyperthyroidism. J. Vet. Intern. Med. 13 (4):323-329; 1999.

3. Edinboro, C.H. et al.: Epidemiologic study of relationships between consumption of commercial canned food and risk of hyperthyroidism in cats. JAVMA 224 (6):879-886; 2004.

4. White, H.L. et al.: Effect of dietary soy on serum thyroid hormone concentrations in healthy adult cats. AJVR 65 (5):586-591; 2004.

5. Hammer, K.B. et al.: Altered expression of G proteins in thyroid gland adenomas obtained from hyperthyroid cats. AJVR 61 (8):874-879; 2000.

6. Merryman, J.I. et al.: Overexpression of c-Ras in hyperplasia and adenomas of the feline thyroid gland: An immunohistochemical analysis of 34 cases. Vet. Pathol. 36 (2):117-124; 1999.

7. Pearce, S.H. et al.: Mutational analysis of the thyrotropin receptor gene in sporadic and familial feline thyrotoxicosis. Thyroid 7 (6):923-927; 1997.

8. Peeters, M.E. et al.: Feline thyroid adenomas are in part associated with mutations in the G(s alpha) gene and not with polymorphisms found in the thyrotropin receptor. Thyroid 12 (7):571-575; 2002.


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Source: VETERINARY MEDICINE,
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