CVC Highlights: Bathing is key to managing pruritus in dogs and cats - Veterinary Medicine
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CVC Highlights: Bathing is key to managing pruritus in dogs and cats
The more we learn about how allergens enter the body, the better we understand why shampooing is so useful in pruritic animals. Here, Dr. Nesbitt describes the shampoo regimens he finds most beneficial in symptomatically treating pruritus.


VETERINARY MEDICINE


Client instructions

Properly educate your clients to get the best results from shampooing. Tell them to use cool water and to shampoo for 10 minutes every two to seven days. Afterward, pets should be towel-dried because blow-drying results in vasodilation and may exacerbate pruritus. A leave-on or rinse-off conditioner may also be applied. A puppy clip may be considered in some patients, as shorter hair facilitates the ease of bathing. Surface debris loosened with the bathing and subsequent exfoliation of the dead epidermal cells may be retained in the longer hair.

I recommend administering topical antiparasitic agents that use the surface lipids for distribution over the body 24 to 48 hours after a bath, and then waiting 48 hours after application before bathing again. Then continue with the bathing schedule, but apply each subsequent dose of topical antiparasitic at intervals according to the product label recommendations.

REFERENCES

1. Hillier A, Griffin CE. The ACVD task force on canine atopic dermatitis (I): incidence and prevalence. Vet Immunol Immunopathol 2001;81:147-150.

2. Griffin CE, DeBoer DJ. The ACVD task force on canine atopic dermatitis (XIV): clinical manifestations of canine atopic dermatitis. Vet Immunol Immunopathol 2001;81:255-269.

3. Olivry T, Hill PB. The ACVD task force on canine atopic dermatitis (XIV): the controversy surrounding the route of allergen challenge in canine atopic dermatitis. Vet Immunol Immunopathol 2001;81:219-225.

4. Nesbitt GH, Freeman LM, Hannah SS. Correlations of fatty acid supplementation, aeroallergens, shampoo, and ear cleanser with multiple parameters in pruritic dogs. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2004;40:270-284.

Attendees selected this highlight from CVC lectures. The original paper was published in the proceedings of the 2005 Central Veterinary Conference.


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Source: VETERINARY MEDICINE,
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