New findings on the effects of xylitol ingestion in dogs - Veterinary Medicine
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New findings on the effects of xylitol ingestion in dogs
Once thought to cause only hypoglycemia in dogs, this sugar substitute has recently been discovered to also produce acute, possibly life-threatening liver disease and coagulopathy. And the number of reported exposures to xylitol has been increasing.


VETERINARY MEDICINE


PROGNOSIS

The prognosis for uncomplicated hypoglycemia is good with prompt treatment. Mild increases in liver enzyme activities usually resolve within a few days with supportive care. On the other hand, if severe elevation of liver enzyme activities, hyperbilirubinemia, and coagulopathy develop, the prognosis is guarded to poor. In addition, hyperphosphatemia appears to be a poor prognostic indicator.

CONCLUSION

Xylitol is an emerging toxicosis in the United States. The number of products that contain xylitol have been growing steadily over the past few years, as have the exposures to xylitol reported to the aspca apcc. Because of the potential for rapid onset of signs, treatment should be instituted in all cases in which a dog may have ingested > 0.1 g/kg of xylitol.

Eric K. Dunayer, MS, VMD, DABT, DABVT
ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center
1717 S. Philo Road, Suite 3
Urbana, IL 61802

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