Pediatric dentistry: An overview of common problems you'll see in practice - Veterinary Medicine
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Pediatric dentistry: An overview of common problems you'll see in practice
Can you readily identify persistent deciduous teeth, malocclusions, and unerupted teeth in puppies and kittens? If these and other oral conditions are caught early and properly treated, you can help start patients on the right path toward good lifelong dental health.


VETERINARY MEDICINE


Treatment

Viral papillomas are generally self-limiting and will resolve over a period of weeks to months. Typically, no therapy is required. After regression, patients are generally immune to reinfection.19 However, there are reasons to initiate therapy in suspected cases of papillomatosis. First, the papillomas can become infected, which may result in marked local inflammation. Also, they can mimic more aggressive tumors, and, finally, malignant transformation has been reported.20

Consider surgical removal or debulking with histologic analysis in patients in which the masses are severely infected or are large and interfere with mastication.12 In addition, histology (ideally excisional) should be pursued if the growths are not regressing or look atypical. Excision can be performed with a standard surgical approach, cryosurgery, electrosurgery, or laser therapy.

Additional therapeutic measures in persistent cases include vaccination, traumatic crushing, and chemotherapy.12 However, vaccination has not proved particularly successful, and squamous cell carcinomas have been reported to arise at the injection sites.21

Brook A. Niemiec, DVM, DAVDC
Southern California Veterinary Dental Specialties
5610 Kearny Mesa Road, Suite B1
San Diego, CA 92111

REFERENCES

1. Bellows JE, Dumais Y, Gioso MA, et al. Clarification of veterinary dental nomenclature. J Vet Dent 2005;22:272-279.

2. Harvey CE, Emily PP. Occlusion, occlusal abnormalities, and orthodontic treatment. In: Harvey CE, Emily PP, eds. Small animal dentistry, St. Louis, Mo: Mosby, 1993;266-296.

3. Wiggs RB, Lobprise HB. Oral anatomy and physiology. In: Wiggs RB, Lobprise HB, eds. Veterinary dentistry: principles and practice. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott–Raven, 1997;55-86.

4. Wiggs RB, Lobprise HB. Pedodontics. In: Wiggs RB, Lobprise HB, eds. Veterinary dentistry: principles and practice. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott–Raven, 1997;167-185.

5. Hale FA. Juvenile veterinary dentistry. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 2005;35:789-817.

6. Neville BW, Damm DD, Allen CM, et al. Abnormalities of teeth. In: Oral and maxillofacial pathology. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders, 2002;49-106.

7. Wiggs RB, Lobprise HB. Basics of orthodontics. In: Wiggs RB, Lobprise HB, eds. Veterinary dentistry: principles and practice. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott–Raven, 1997;435-481.

8. Bellows J. Atlas of canine dentistry: malocclusions and breed standards. Waltham publication.

9. Verhaert L. A removable orthodontic device for the treatment of lingually displaced mandibular canine teeth in dogs. J Vet Dent 1999;16:69-75.

10. Niemiec BA, Mulligan TM. Assessment of vital pulp therapy for nine complicated crown fractures and fifty-four crown reductions in dogs and cats. J Vet Dent 2001;18:122-125.

11. Amimoto A, Iwamoto S, Taura Y, et al. Effects of surgical orthodontic treatment for malalignment due to the prolonged retention of deciduous canines in young dogs. J Vet Med Sci 1993;55:73-79.

12. Wiggs RB, Lobprise HB. Clinical oral pathology. In: Wiggs RB, Lobprise HB, eds. Veterinary dentistry: principles and practice. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott–Raven, 1997;104-139.

13. Raghoebar GM, Boering G, Vissink A. Clinical, radiographic, and histological characteristics of secondary retention of permanent molars. J Dent 1991;19:164-170.


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