How to obtain the best dental radiographs - Veterinary Medicine
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How to obtain the best dental radiographs
Improve your dental radiography technique with this guide for taking both standard and digital radiographs.


VETERINARY MEDICINE SUPPLEMENT


CONCLUSION

Taking the time to properly position a patient, the film, and the beam head for dental radiographs is critical—the positioning and technique change greatly depending on the tooth. The development process is vital as well so that images come out clear and can be read for years to come. See the next article for advice on interpreting dental radiographs.

Author's Note: All photographs demonstrating positioning are shown with a standard dental film to optimize the visibility of tube head placement, film placement, and the correct angles between them. All radiographs except Figures 19 and 20 were obtained with a size 2 dental digital sensor to provide optimum print quality.

Editors' Note: Dr. Niemiec is a co-founder of the dental radiography consultation service VetDentalRad.com.

*For example, Gendex from Dentsply/Gendex Division.
**For example, Image-Vet 70 ACP from AFP Imaging, Corix Pro 70 from Dentalaire Products, and Provecta V from AllPro Imaging.
***For example, Insta-fix and Insta-neg from Microcopy.

Brook A. Niemiec, DVM, DAVDC, FAVD
Southern California Veterinary Dental Specialists
5610 Kearny Mesa Road, Suite B1
San Diego, CA 92111

REFERENCES

1. Holmstrom SE, Bellows J, Colmery B. AAHA Dental Care Guidelines for Dogs and Cats. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2005;41:277-283.

2. Niemiec BA, Gilbert T, Sabitino D. Equipment and basic geometry of dental radiography. J Vet Dent 2004;21:48-52.

3. Mulligan TW, Allen MS, Williams CA. Intraoral imaging techniques. In: Atlas of canine and feline dental radiology. Trenton, NJ: Veterinary Learning Systems, 1998;27-44.

4. Oakes A. Radiology techniques. In: Deforge DH, Colmery BH, eds. An atlas of veterinary dental radiology. Ames: Iowa State University Press, 2000;xxi-xxvi.

5. Holmstrom SE, Frost P, Eisner ER. Dental radiology. In: Veterinary dental techniques. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: WB Saunders Co, 1998;107-131.

6. Wiggs RB, Lobprise HB. Dental and oral radiology. Veterinary dentistry—principles and practice. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott-Raven, 1997;140-156.

7. Mulligan TW, Aller MS, Williams CA. Projection geometry. In: Atlas of canine and feline dental radiology. Trenton, NJ: Veterinary Learning Systems, 1998;15-22.

8. Niemiec BA, Furman R. Feline dental radiography. J Vet Dent 2004;21:252-257.

9. Niemiec BA, Furman R. Canine dental radiography. J Vet Dent 2004;21:186-190.

10. Gracis M. Radiographic study of the maxillary canine tooth in four mesaticephalic cats. J Vet Dent 1999;16:115-128.

11. Gracis M, Harvey CE. Radiographic study of the maxillary canine tooth in mesaticephalic dogs. J Vet Dent 1998;15:73-78.

12. Mulligan TW, Aller MS, Williams CA. Extraoral imaging techniques. In: Atlas of canine and feline dental radiology. Trenton, NJ: Veterinary Learning Systems, 1998;23-26.

13. Mulligan TW, Aller MS, Williams CA. Technical errors and troubleshooting. In: Atlas of canine and feline dental radiology. Trenton, NJ: Veterinary Learning Systems, 1998;45-64.

14. Niemiec BA, Sabitino D, Gilbert T. Developing dental radiographs. J Vet Dent 2004;21:116-121.

15. Mulligan TW, Aller MS, Williams CA. Basic equipment needs. In: Atlas of canine and feline dental radiology. Trenton, NJ: Veterinary Learning Systems, 1998;7-14.


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