Veterinary dermatology medicine and news: Diagnosing and treating skin problems - Veterinary Medicine
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Dermatology
Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

My dog has MRSA: what does it mean and how to fight the bug (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

Canine pyoderma is a common secondary problem, a leading cause of antibiotic use in dogs, and an often frustrating problem for vets and pet owners alike. Unlike many other types of infections, skin infections are often recurrent. This frequently leads to an ongoing cycle of being on and off of antibiotics.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Diagnosing and managing nonpruritic alopeci (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

Alopecia in the dog is a common clinical finding. It is most commonly associated with pruritus due to allergic skin disease. There are also many causes of nonpruritic alopecia. Since the skin and hair can only "react" in a limited manner regardless of the triggering event, signalment, history (hx), physical exam (PE) and laboratory testing (eg skin scrapings, skin biopsies, fungal cultures, endocrine testing, intradermal testing, etc) all may be needed to help determine the underlying cause.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

The CSI approach to pruritic pets: dermatology due diligence (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

Once you have finished interviewing the witnesses, the next step is to collect the evidence. A minimum database ("derm–due-diligence") for any pruritic pet should include skin scrapings, close examination for external parasites (fleas, ticks, and lice), acetate tape tests, cytology and possibly coat brushings.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Diseases of the nasal planum (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

This condition affects dogs of any age or breed, although German shepherds are predisposed. It affects the mucocutaneous junctions (MCJs) of the nose and lips most frequently, but other MCJs can also be affected. This is a surface bacterial infection (usually S. pseudintermedius) wherein there is a "standoff" between the bacteria and the immune system at the MCJ.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

New drugs in dermatology (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

In the field of veterinary medicine we see a constant search for newer, more effective, and convenient but inexpensive drugs with lesser side effects. Not only new drugs are interesting, but old drugs are occasionally rediscovered for new indications.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

The CSI approach to pruritic pets–secondary dermatology testing (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

In order to understand when and how to culture, it may be useful to first understand a bit about the etiology and pathophysiology regarding pyoderma:

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Dermatology for technicians (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

Protocols are useful in helping to diagnose and treated many different disorders. Part of any good protocol should be a minimum data base (MDB). In addition to signalment, history, etc in veterinary dermatology laboratory testing should be a component of this data base.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Diagnosis of canine hyperadrenocorticism: What is the role of the sex hormone profile? (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

Approximately 80 to 85% of cases of hyperadrenocorticism in dogs are due to pituitary dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH), with the remainder due to an adrenocortical tumor (AT). Cortisol is the most common secretory product of the adrenal gland in hyperadrenocorticism.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Pustules and crusts: What else can it be besides pyoderma? (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

Pustules, crusts and epidermal collarettes are superficial skin lesions which are often seen in association with superficial pyoderma. Although in such situations a pyoderma is the most likely diagnosis and antibiotic therapy is justified, other diseases should be considered, especially after poor response to initial therapy.

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