Articles by Dennis T. (Tim) Crowe, Jr., DVM, DACVS, DACVECC, FCCM, DACHM, NREMT-I, CFF - Veterinary Medicine
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Articles by Dennis T. (Tim) Crowe, Jr., DVM, DACVS, DACVECC, FCCM, DACHM, NREMT-I, CFF

Delivering supplemental oxygen to dogs and cats: Table 1

Oct 1, 2009

Table 1: Percent of oxygen achieved and time taken to reach noted levels.

Delivering supplemental oxygen to dogs and cats: Photos 1A and 1B

Oct 1, 2009

Photos 1A and 1B: A nasal cannula is inserted and fixed in place by placing skin staples into the nose band made of adhesive tape. The oxygen tubing Y section "slides" snug behind the head.

Delivering supplemental oxygen to dogs and cats: Photo 3

Oct 1, 2009

Photo 3: Plastic wrap is laid over the ventral 50 percent to 80 percent of an Elizabethan collar and oxygen tubing attached on the inside. This Crowe collar is very effective in supplying supplemental oxygen to patients without using invasive means or causing isolation.

Delivering supplemental oxygen to dogs and cats: Photo 4

Oct 1, 2009

Photo 4: Mask with a non-rebreathing system attached. This system also is fitted with a positive end-expirarory pressure (PEEP) valve or a restrictor assay valve.

Delivering supplemental oxygen to dogs and cats: Photo 6

Oct 1, 2009

Photo 6: Results of a research study comparing oxygen concentrations reached over time with various methods of oxygen delivery.

Delivering supplemental oxygen to dogs and cats: Photo 2

Oct 1, 2009

Photo 2: A nasal catheter is placed and secured with a suture at the base of the nostril and several sutures or skin staples used to hold it to the side of the patient's face. A section of adhesive tape is used to secure the catheter and oxygen tubing as well.

Delivering supplemental oxygen to dogs and cats: a practical review

Oct 1, 2009

Patients facing immediate, life-threatening conditions must have an inhaled oxygen concentration as high as possible. Eight additional methods are discussed in this second of two parts.

Delivering supplemental oxygen to dogs and cats: Photo 5

Oct 1, 2009

Photo 5: Oxygen analyzer used to determine oxygen percentage inside a Crowe Collar being used on a cat with breathing difficulty.

Rapid, reliable lung-lobe removal using a modified Miller's knot

Aug 1, 2009

Reintroducing the "flashing" technique, also useful for wide vascular pedicles requiring ligation

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