Articles by Craig Datz, DVM, MS, DABVP - Veterinary Medicine
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Articles by Craig Datz, DVM, MS, DABVP

Noncore vaccines: which ones and how often? Part 1 – dogs (Proceedings)

Nov 1, 2009

Practitioners may choose to vaccinate with most or all of the vaccines available, with the belief that prevention is better than treating the disease.

Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia and immune-mediated arthritis (Proceedings)

Nov 1, 2009

There are a number of causes of decreased platelets in dogs and cats, but whenever platelet counts fall acutely an immune-mediated disorder should be suspected.

Probiotics and nutritional supplements: Do they really "boost" the immune system? (Proceedings)

Nov 1, 2009

Considering the large impact of immunology on companion animal practice, it's natural to wonder what role nutrition plays.

Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (Proceedings)

Nov 1, 2009

Disease conditions that lead to anemia can be divided into two general categories: regenerative and nonregenerative.

Diagnosing common infectious diseases – What do all those new tests, titers, PCRs, and blue dots really mean? Part 1: dogs (Proceedings)

Nov 1, 2009

There is a wide variety of diagnostic tests available to practitioners for infectious and immune-mediated diseases.

2009 vaccine update: core vaccines and realistic protocols for dogs (Proceedings)

Nov 1, 2009

In recent years, vaccination protocols have undergone a number of changes, such as which vaccines to give, when, and how often.

Noncore vaccines: which ones and how often? Part 2 – cats (Proceedings)

Nov 1, 2009

As with canine vaccines, feline products are now categorized as core, noncore, and not generally recommended.

Diagnosing common infectious diseases – What do all those new tests, titers, PCRs, and blue dots really mean? Part 2: cats (Proceedings)

Nov 1, 2009

In some ways, diagnosing disease in cats is more difficult than in dogs.

Adverse vaccination events: Separating fact from fiction (Proceedings)

Nov 1, 2009

Vaccines are such a routine part of everyday veterinary practice that we often forget about potential reactions and complications until they occur.

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