Articles by Gregory F. Grauer, DVM, MS, DACVIM - Veterinary Medicine
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Articles by Gregory F. Grauer, DVM, MS, DACVIM

Top ten questions about UTIs (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2011

Most bacterial infections of the lower urinary tract respond quickly to antimicrobial treatment; however, urinary tract infections (UTI) associated with defects in the host immune system (complicated UTI) often fail to respond or recur after antibiotic withdrawal and can be a therapeutic challenge.

The nuts and bolts of proteinuria (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2011

Persistent proteinuria of renal origin is an important marker of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in dogs and cats. Unfortunately, due to the high incidence of false-positive results for proteinuria on the urine dipstick screening test and proteinuria associated with lower urinary tract inflammation, positive reactions for urine protein are quite common and therefore often disregarded.

The nuts and bolts of azotemia (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2011

Azotemia is defined as increased concentrations of urea and creatinine (and other nonproteinaceous nitrogenous substances) in the blood. The interpretation of serum urea nitrogen and creatinine concentrations as a measure of renal function requires a knowledge of the production and excretion of these substances.

Can I use NSAIDS to treat osteoarthritis in dogs with liver and kidney disease? (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2011

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common problem that affects an estimated 0.5 to 7% of dogs. Radiographic signs of osteoarthritis (OA) occur in 20% of dogs.

Modulating proteinuria and hypertension of chronic kidney disease (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2011

By altering pre-glomerular resistance, healthy kidneys can maintain relatively stable glomerular capillary pressures despite variations in systemic blood pressure. This process is termed "renal autoregulation". Autoregulation can be reduced when renal disease results in loss of nephrons.

Feline hyperthyroidism: a view from the urinary tract (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2011

Hyperthyroidism is one of the most commonly diagnosed diseases of the older cat. Geriatric cats with hyperthyroidism may also have concurrent chronic kidney disease (CKD). Systemic hypertension, proteinuria, and urinary tract infection (UTI) can be consequences of either hyperthyroidism or CKD.

A case-based approach to patients with azotemia (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2010

Azotemia is defined as increased concentrations of urea and creatinine (and other nonproteinaceous nitrogenous substances) in the blood. The interpretation of serum urea nitrogen and creatinine concentrations as a measure of renal function requires a knowledge of the production and excretion of these substances.

Approach to patients with a complicated or recurrent UTI (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2010

Most bacterial infections of the lower urinary tract respond quickly to antimicrobial treatment; however, urinary tract infections (UTI) associated with defects in the host immune system (complicated UTI) often fail to respond or recur after antibiotic withdrawal and can be a therapeutic challenge.

New thoughts about chronic kidney disease (Part 1) (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2010

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common problem that affects an estimated 0.5 to 7% of dogs and 1.6 to 20% of cats. Nephron damage associated with CKD is usually irreversible and can be progressive. Renal failure results when three-quarters or more of the nephrons of both kidneys are not functioning.

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