Articles by Tamara Grubb, DVM, MS, DACVA - Veterinary Medicine
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Articles by Tamara Grubb, DVM, MS, DACVA

Chronic pain: nonpharmacologic therapy (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Our patient population has changed fairly dramatically in the last 10 years as our medical skills have progressed and we have become capable of supporting patients with advanced disease and advancing age. With this new set of patients comes a new set of problems, like chronic pain.

Building a pain management focused practice (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Pain management is a win/win situation for both the patient and the practice. The appropriately analgesed patient has a better quality of life and heals faster, while the practice increases profits and client satisfaction. There is no negative impact of good pain management in the practice and every practice should strive to have the best pain management practices possible.

Analgesia for cats (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Because we want to succeed! If we want to do the best medicine possible and give our patients the best chance to heal, then we have to treat pain. Pain initiates a fairly profound stress response and a sympathetic overdrive. Stress and autonomic imbalance are not benign and the cascade of side effects include gastrointestinal (GI) ileus, GI ulceration, clotting dysfunction, hypertension, tachycardia, tachyarrhythmias, and many others.

Opioids: Why should poppies be so popular? (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Opioids are a group of natural derivatives or synthetic relatives of opium, which is extracted from the exudate of seedpods of the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum. The poppy plant appears to have been cultivated in ancient civilizations, like those of Persia, Egypt and Mesopotamia, and the first known written reference to the poppy appears in 4,000 BC (from 'A Brief History of Opium' at http://opiates.net).

Perioperative analgesia: surgery doesn't have to be a pain (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

No matter what anesthetic protocol is chosen, the addition of adequate analgesia is imperative for safe anesthesia. Most anesthetic agents, including the anesthetic gases, block the brain's response to pain but don't actually block pain. If the pain is severe enough, the brain can still respond and make the animal appear to be inadequately anesthetized.

Pain management for emergency & critical care patients (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Our patient population has changed fairly dramatically in the last 10 years as our medical skills have progressed and we have become capable of supporting patients with advanced disease and advancing age.

Chronic pain: pharmacologic treatment (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Acute pain has an initial biological purpose in that it initiates a protective withdrawal reflex when a painful stimulus is encountered so that the tissue damage is minimized. Because of its usefulness, acute pain is often called 'physiologic pain'. Unfortunately, unlike acute pain, chronic pain serves no biological purpose.

Analgesia drop by drop: constant rate infusions made easy (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Constant rate infusions (CRI) of analgesic drugs are an excellent way to manage pain in both dogs and cats.

Have you got the nerve? (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Local anesthetic drugs are extremely effective, inexpensive and easy to use. When local anesthetic drugs are administered, pain impulses originating in the periphery are blocked and prevented from reaching the central nervous system.

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