Articles by Jody P. Lulich, DVM, PhD, DACVIM - Veterinary Medicine
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Articles by Jody P. Lulich, DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Feline urolith epidemiology update: 1981 to 2012

Tracking the trends of mineral composition in cats with urolithiasis.
Feb 1, 2014

Tracking the trends of mineral composition in cats with urolithiasis.

Veterinarians look at feline urethal plug compostion analysis in 2011

Past veterinary trends continue, but with therapeutic preventative options available, many plugs can be avoided.
Jul 1, 2012

Past veterinary trends continue, but with therapeutic preventative options available, many plugs can be avoided.

Feline urolith epidemiology update

Tracking the trends of mineral composition in cats with urolithiasis.
Jun 1, 2012

Dr. Carl Osborne tracks the trends of mineral composition in cats with urolithiasis.

Part One: Veterinary canine urolith epidemiology: 1981-2011

Mineral composition trends have been stabilizing in recent years.
May 1, 2012

Mineral composition trends have been stabilizing in recent years.

Feline urethal plugs: 2010

A look at composition provides insight into ways to prevent plugs in the first place
Aug 1, 2011

A look at composition provides insight into ways to prevent plugs in the first place.

Canine urolith epidemiology: 1981 to 2010

Data indicate an increase in calcium, oxalate uroliths compared with the past
Jul 1, 2011

In the last three decades, the composition of uroliths in dogs has been variable.

Feline urolith epidemiology: 1981 to 2010

Update your practice with a summary of the latest work on this troubling ailment
Jun 1, 2011

Dr. Carl Osborne examines feline urolith composition over the past three decades.

Unmasking the toxic culprit(s) in pet-food recalls

Sep 1, 2008

What is your interpretation and diagnosis?

Quantitative urolith analysis: A standard of practice?

Dec 1, 2007

A quarter-century ago, analysis of uroliths removed (usually by surgery) was optional. In fact, rather than have the stones analyzed, some veterinary practitioners gave them to their clients as a topic of conversation. What about today? Is it an acceptable standard of practice to give stones retrieved from the urinary tract to owners without knowing their composition? What would be your response to a physician who gave you stones retrieved from your urinary tract? Believe it or not, we have received uroliths for analysis formed by our veterinary colleagues that were given to them by a physician. Of course, we did not perform the requested analysis because we did not want to cross the line of practicing medicine without a license. Instead, we sent them to a laboratory licensed to provide that service.

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