Articles by Elizabeth Rozanski, DVM, DACVECC, DACVIM - Veterinary Medicine
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Articles by Elizabeth Rozanski, DVM, DACVECC, DACVIM

Using blood gases in practice (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2010

Blood gas, electrolyte and lactate analysis are very useful in management of the ill or injured dog or cat. Knowledge of normal values and what they indicate can help improve patient care and understanding of the pathophysiological changes accompanying critical illness.

Pulmonary edema (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2010

Pulmonary edema is defined as the accumulation of abnormal amount of extravascular lung water. Pulmonary edema may range from clinically insignificant to life-threatening. Pulmonary edema forms when there is an alternation in the balance of Starling forces (hydrostatic and colloid osmotic) between the interstitium and pulmonary capillary beds that favors increasing filtration to the interstitium. Increased capillary hydrostatic forces will result in a low protein edema fluid while lowered colloid osmotic forces will promote a high protein edema fluid.

Pulmonary vascular disease (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2010

Pulmonary vascular disease or pulmonary vascular obstructive disease (PVOD). is a catch-all term for conditions that affect the pulmonary circulation. These conditions are of particular importance to as they may result in severe respiratory dysfunction. As a review, the pulmonary and systemic circulation are in series, with the cardiac output of the left and right heart (in the absence of cardiac shunt) being equal.

Localization of pulmonary problems (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2010

Evaluation of the pet with respiratory disease may be challenging. The best approach to problem solving usually reflects first an assessment for immediate intervention, and then careful evaluation to localize the problem, and then finally determination of the specific problem and the available options for controlling or curing it. Immediate intervention is warranted in any pet that is having difficulty breathing.

Managing thoracic trauma (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2010

Traumatic thoracic injuries are prevalent in small animals, particularly in dogs. The most common causes of thoracic trauma are motor vehicular accidents and bite wounds. Other possible, although less common mechanisms include gunshot, knife wounds or being kicked by a larger animal (horse/cow). Injuries may range from mild to life threatening.

Managing pleural effusion (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2010

The pleural space is defined as the area between the lungs and the chest wall. Normally there is no soft tissue or free air present in this space. A very small amount of fluid (undetectable on radiographs or ultrasound) may be present within the thoracic cavity. Clinical signs of pleural space disease include tachypnea or difficulty breathing.

Procedures in respiratory medicine (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2010

Treating animals with respiratory distress may be very challenging. It is essential for the practitioner to have a strong knowledge base of available therapeutic and diagnostic techniques. It is also prudent to be prepared for any potential complications that may develop during diagnostic or therapeutic interventions.

Chest trauma (Proceedings)

Nov 1, 2009

Traumatic thoracic injuries are prevalent in small animals, particularly in dogs.

Pulmonary edema (Proceedings)

Nov 1, 2009

Pulmonary edema is defined as the accumulation of abnormal amount of extravascular lung water.

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