Articles by Sherry Sanderson, BS, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DACVN - Veterinary Medicine
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Articles by Sherry Sanderson, BS, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DACVN

Prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2009

The gastrointestinal tract in dogs and cats is a very dynamic organ that performs numerous functions essential for health and well-being.

Raw diet: Do they make you want to BARF? (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2009

Undoubtedly, if you are in small animal practice, you have encountered pet owners who are feeding raw diets, and these owners tend to be very passionate about this practice of feeding raw foods.

Nutritional and medical management of canine urolithiasis, Part 1 (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2009

The purpose of the lecture is to provide an overview and an update on therapeutic options available for the four most common mineral types of uroliths in dogs.

Nutritional and medical management of canine urolithiasis, Part 2 (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2009

During the past three decades, a tremendous amount of information has been generated regarding the etiology, detection, treatment, and prevention of canine urolithiasis.

Management of acute urethral obstruction (Proceedings)

Aug 1, 2009

Urethral obstruction is a life-threatening situation.

Obesity management traditional and new approaches (Proceedings)

Oct 1, 2008

It is estimated that 24% to 44% of dogs and cats in the United States are overweight.

Canine urolithiasis overview and update (Proceedings)

Oct 1, 2008

During the past three decades, a tremendous amount of information has been generated regarding the etiology, detection, treatment, and prevention of canine urolithiasis.

Nutritional management of heart disease (Proceedings)

Oct 1, 2008

Knowledge about management of heart disease in Veterinary Medicine has grown tremendously in the last two decades.

Current concepts for management of chronic renal failure in dogs: early diagnosis and supportive care (Proceedings)

Oct 1, 2008

Urine concentrating ability is impaired when 66% of nephrons are no longer functioning, and azotemia develops when 75% of nephrons are no longer functioning.

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