Articles by Barrak Pressler, DVM, PhD, DACVIM - Veterinary Medicine
  • SEARCH:
Medicine Center
DVM Veterinary Medicine Featuring Information from:

ADVERTISEMENT

Articles by Barrak Pressler, DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Advanced interpretation of the urine dipstick (Proceedings)

Apr 1, 2010

In addition to the CBC and chemistry panel, the urinalysis is the third component of the minimum database. In addition to helping in the evaluation and monitoring of diseases of the kidneys and the lower urinary tract, a urinalysis provides information on the function of a number of other organs.

Stones vs. crystals: Management and prevention (Proceedings)

Apr 1, 2010

Crystalluria: Struvite crystalluria occurs in greater than 50% of healthy dogs, including animals without urinary tract infections; these crystals are also common in healthy cats. Incidental struvite crystalluria occurs because the mineral components of these crystals (magnesium, ammonia, phosphate) are normally excreted in large amounts into urine, and supersaturation leads to precipitation.

Advanced interpretation of the urine sediment (Proceedings)

Apr 1, 2010

Urine sediment examination is an essential part of the urinalysis. As discussed in the previous lecture, a urinalysis should be performed whenever blood is collected for a 'metabolic screen' or 'healthy animal exam,' or a clinician is investigating any systemic disease.

Using titers to diagnose disease: When is a positive a positive? (Proceedings)

Apr 1, 2010

For most diagnostic tests, the 'titer' is the minimum dilution of a substance that is required to yield a positive result.

Hot dogs: Fever of unknown origin (Proceedings)

Apr 1, 2010

In human medicine, fever of unknown origin (FUO) is defined as pyrexia of greater than two to three weeks duration (i.e. sufficient time for self-limiting infections to resolve) during which repeat physical examinations and standard diagnostic testing have failed to reveal an underlying cause.

Non-core vaccines: FIP, canine corona, Lyme disease, and Bordetella (Proceedings)

Apr 1, 2010

Non-core vaccines are those which we as a profession have determined are not recommended for all dogs or cats. Vaccination, in general, has the benefit of potentially lessening the prevalence or severity of disease, ensuring that patients are examined on a regular basis, increasing practice revenue, and potentially saving clients money in the long-run.

The basics of treating glomerular disease (Proceedings)

Apr 1, 2010

The reasons why proteinuria is directly associated with progression of renal disease are multifactorial.

Evidence-based management of ITP (Proceedings)

Apr 1, 2010

Dogs with immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (ITP) usually present with platelet counts low enough to be considered life-threatening, although overt signs of bleeding are uncommon.

Evidence-based microalbuminuria testing (Proceedings)

Apr 1, 2010

Conventional urine dipsticks are the standard initial screening test for detection of proteinuria. Urine albumin concentration must be approximately 30 mg/dl or greater to be detected by this method.

ADVERTISEMENT

Click here