Articles by Don R. Waldron, DVM, DACVS - Veterinary Medicine
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Articles by Don R. Waldron, DVM, DACVS

Don R. Waldron, DVM, DACVS


Articles
Feline urinary diversion procedures (Proceedings)
November 1, 2010

Urine diversion techniques are performed to temporarily or permanently divert urine from its normal anatomic course from the kidney through the ureter to the bladder and finally through the urethra. Veterinarians are most familiar with temporary urine diversion (urethral catheters) that are often used to stabilize animals that are sick as a result of metabolic changes associated with urinary tract obstruction.

Laryngeal paralysis in dogs and cats (Proceedings)
November 1, 2010

Laryngeal paralysis is a congenital or acquired disease that causes upper airway obstruction. Paralysis causes partial or complete obstruction of the laryngeal lumen due to denervation of the cricoarytenoideus dorsalis muscle of the larynx. Interruption of nerve transmission from the recurrent laryngeal nerve or the vagus results in failure of the arytenoid cartilages and vocal folds to abduct on inspiration.

Feline megacolon and colonic neoplasia (Proceedings)
November 1, 2010

Megacolon occurs more frequently in cats than dogs and is usually seen in middle-aged to geriatric cats. The ascending, transverse, and descending colon are chronically large in diameter and filled with dry stool. A congenital form of the disease has been seen especially in Manx cats with rectal/anal atresia and a sacral spinal deformity.

Upper urinary tract surgical disease (Proceedings)
November 1, 2010

Careful consideration of preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative management techniques will assist in preventing complications related to anesthesia and surgery in patients with urinary tract surgical disease. Hospital acquired renal insufficiency is common in humans, seemingly less so in animals but caution is advised. Hypotension of any cause is a potential predisposing cause to renal failure.

Practical use of tubes and drains (Proceedings)
November 1, 2010

Tube drainage of the thorax is indicated to drain free air or fluid in the pleural space. This is not an absolute indication as small amounts of air within the thorax do not require a thoracostomy tube. Similarly, the presence of blood within the pleural space is not usually an indication for thoracic drainage.

Canine and feline laryngeal paralysis (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

Laryngeal paralysis is a congenital or acquired disease that causes upper airway obstruction. Paralysis causes partial or complete obstruction of the laryngeal lumen due to denervation of the cricoarytenoideus dorsalis muscle of the larynx. Interruption of nerve transmission from the recurrent laryngeal nerve or the vagus results in failure of the arytenoid cartilages and vocal folds to abduct on inspiration.

Surgical upper urinary tract disease in dogs (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

Careful consideration of preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative management techniques will assist in preventing complications related to anesthesia and surgery in patients with urinary tract surgical disease. Hospital acquired renal insufficiency is common in humans, seemingly less so in animals but caution is advised. Hypotension of any cause is a potential predisposing cause to renal failure.

Idiopathic megacolon and colectomy in cats (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

Megacolon occurs more frequently in cats than dogs and is usually seen in middle-aged to geriatric cats. The ascending, transverse, and descending colon are chronically large in diameter and filled with dry stool. A congenital form of the disease has been seen especially in Manx cats with rectal/anal atresia and a sacral spinal deformity. An acquired form of the disease has been seen secondary to mechanical obstruction caused by malunion of pelvic fractures that have not had surgical treatment.

Feline urinary diversion procedures (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

Urine diversion techniques are performed to temporarily or permanently divert urine from its normal anatomic course from the kidney through the ureter to the bladder and finally through the urethra. Veterinarians are most familiar with temporary urine diversion (urethral catheters) that are often used to stabilize animals that are sick as a result of metabolic changes associated with urinary tract obstruction. Temporary diversion (peritoneal drainage) may also be used as a bridge to more definitive surgical procedures such as repair of a ruptured urinary bladder.

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