Articles by Michael R. Lappin, DVM, PhD, DACVIM - Veterinary Medicine
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Articles by Michael R. Lappin, DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Michael R. Lappin, DVM, PhD, DACVIM


Articles
Management and prevention of feline infectious gastrointestinal diseases (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

Vomiting is the forceful ejection of stomach and proximal duodenal contents through the mouth. Vomiting can be induced by vestibular, vagal, chemoreceptor trigger zone, or direct input to the emetic center. Diarrhea is a characterized by increased frequency of defecation, increased fluid content of the stool, or increased volume of stool.

Managing and preventing feline febrile diseases (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

The 2 major differentials for elevated body temperature (> 102.5 F) are fever (pyrexia) and hyperthermia. Hyperthermia results from increased muscle activity, increased environmental temperature, or increased metabolic rate (i.e. hyperthyroidism). Fever develops when the thermoregulatory set point in the hypothalamus is increased, resulting in increased body temperature from physiologic mechanisms inducing endogenous heat production or heat conservation.

Managing and preventing feline respiratory diseases (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

Herpesvirus 1 (rhinotracheitis; FHV-1) and calicivirus (FCV) are the most common viral causes of sneezing and nasal discharge in the cat. If oral ulcers are present, calicivirus is most likely. If corneal ulcers are present, herpesvirus 1 is most likely. FHV-1 has now also been associated with chronic stomatitis, facial dermatitis, and endogenous uveitis. Viral rhinitis with or without secondary bacterial infection can be recurrent.

Clinical and research experiences with probiotics in cats (Sponsored by Nestlé Purina)
March 28, 2011

Part of the 2011 Nestlé Purina Veterinary Symposium publication

Fever of unknown origin in cats (Proceedings)
August 1, 2008

The 2 major differentials for elevated body temperature (> 102.5 F) are fever (pyrexia) and hyperthermia.

Feline vaccination: Guidelines, indications, and risks (Proceedings)
August 1, 2008

A physical examination, fecal parasite screen, and vaccine needs assessment should be performed at least yearly for all cats.

Infectious diseases of the feline GI system (Proceedings)
August 1, 2008

Vomiting is the forceful ejection of stomach and proximal duodenal contents through the mouth.

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