Articles by Philip Bergman, DVM, MS, PhD, DACVIM (oncology) - Veterinary Medicine
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Articles by Philip Bergman, DVM, MS, PhD, DACVIM (oncology)

Philip Bergman, DVM, MS, PhD, DACVIM (oncology)


Articles
What you need to know about mammary gland tumors (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

Mammary gland tumors (MGT) are some of the most common tumors seen in veterinary clinical practice. They are the most common tumor seen in the female dog and the second most common tumor of the female cat.

Paraneoplastic syndromes: What's the big deal? (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) are neoplasm-associated alterations in bodily structure and/or function that occur distant to the tumor. They are an extremely diverse group of clinical aberrations that are associated with the non-invasive actions of the tumor.

Osteosarcoma: What chemo? When? (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common primary bone tumor in the dog (85% of skeletal malignancies). It is estimated to occur in over 8,000 dogs/year in the United States.

Of Mice & Men (and dogs!): Vaccines for cancer? (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

Canine malignant melanoma (CMM) of the oral cavity, nail bed, foot pad and mucocutaneous junction is a spontaneously occurring, highly aggressive and frequently metastatic neoplasm. CMM is a relatively common diagnosis representing ~ 4% of all canine tumors and it is the most common oral tumor in the dog.

Feline head and neck tumors (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

Head and neck tumors are relatively common in cats. An understanding of the differentials in this anatomic location is very important as the diagnostic and therapeutic approach may vary.

Feline vaccine—associated sarcoma: myth or reality? (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

Vaccination has generally been considered to be a benign procedure in veterinary medicine. Unfortunately, soft tissue sarcoma development subsequent to vaccination (vaccine-associated sarcoma; VAS) in cats has dramatically changed this view within our profession over the last twenty years.

Lymphoma: How do I treat? (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

Lymphoma (LSA) is the most common tumor of the cat and represents approximately 80-90% of hematopoietic tumors in cats. LSA is the third most common tumor in the dog with an estimated annual incidence of 13-24/100,000 dogs at risk.

Paraneoplastic syndromes: What's the big deal? (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) are neoplasm-associated alterations in bodily structure and/or function that occur distant to the tumor. They are an extremely diverse group of clinical aberrations that are associated with the non-invasive actions of the tumor.

Mast cell tumors: Margins, markers and prognostic factors (Proceedings)
August 1, 2010

Mast cell tumors (MCT's) are the most common tumor in the dog and the second most common tumor in the cat. MCT's are primarily a disease of older dogs and cats, however, extremely young dogs and cats have been reported to have MCT's.

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