Articles by J. Catharine Scott-Moncrieff, Vet MB, MS, MA, DACVIM, DECVIM - Veterinary Medicine
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Articles by J. Catharine Scott-Moncrieff, Vet MB, MS, MA, DACVIM, DECVIM

J. Catharine Scott-Moncrieff, Vet MB, MS, MA, DACVIM, DECVIM


Articles
Canine hypoadrenocorticism: managing difficult cases (Proceedings)
August 1, 2011

Hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's disease) results from failure of the adrenal glands to secrete glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids. Most cases of hypoadrenocorticism are due to primary adrenal failure, resulting in deficiency of usually both cortisol and aldosterone from the adrenal cortex.

Management of difficult diabetes cases: a case-based approach (Proceedings)
August 1, 2011

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common endocrine disease in dogs and cats characterized by an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin. This results in a decreased ability of cells to take up and utilize not only glucose, but also amino acids, fatty acids, and electrolytes. In addition the lack of insulin results in increased gluconeogenesis, glycogenolysis, lipolysis, ketogenesis, and protein catabolism.

Diagnosis and treatment of canine hypothyroidism and thyroiditis (Proceedings)
August 1, 2011

Hypothyroidism results in decreased production of the thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) from the thyroid gland. At least 95% of cases of canine hypothyroidism are believed to be due to acquired primary hypothyroidism. Destruction of the thyroid gland can result from lymphocytic thyroiditis, idiopathic thyroid atrophy, or rarely neoplastic invasion.

Diagnosis of canine hyperadrenocorticism: What is the role of the sex hormone profile? (Proceedings)
August 1, 2011

Approximately 80 to 85% of cases of hyperadrenocorticism in dogs are due to pituitary dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH), with the remainder due to an adrenocortical tumor (AT). Cortisol is the most common secretory product of the adrenal gland in hyperadrenocorticism.

Logical approach to diagnosis and management of hypoglycemia (Proceedings)
August 1, 2011

In the normal dog fasting does not usually result in hypoglycemia. Therefore a serum glucose concentration < 60 mg/dl is almost always due to either organic disease or to laboratory error. In an animal with normal glucose homeostasis, insulin secretion is stimulated when the blood glucose is > 110 mg/dl; insulin secretion is depressed and secretion of hormones that oppose insulin (epinephrine, glucagon, cortisol, growth hormone) is stimulated when the blood glucose falls below < 60 mg/dl.

Insulin therapy for diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats (Proceedings)
August 1, 2011

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common endocrine disease in dogs and cats characterized by an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin. This results in a decreased ability of cells to take up and utilize not only glucose, but also amino acids, fatty acids, and electrolytes. In addition the lack of insulin results in increased gluconeogenesis, glycogenolysis, lipolysis, ketogenesis, and protein catabolism.

Feline Insulin Solutions: A Roundtable Discussion (Sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc.)
July 23, 2010

A panel of veterinary specialists and general practitioners discuss their real-world experiences in providing successful care to diabetic cats.

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