VETERINARY MEDICINE, Nov 1, 2006 - Veterinary Medicine
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VETERINARY MEDICINE, Nov 1, 2006
Features
Helping owners handle aggressive cats
By Wayne L. Hunthausen, DVM
To help aggressive cats and the families that own them, veterinarians must rule out medical problems, take a complete history, make a sound diagnosis, and provide sensible advice.
Diagnosing and treating common neurologic diseases in rabbits
By James W. Carpenter, MS, DVM, DACZM
Neurologic diseases are relatively common in companion rabbits and are being identified more frequently because of owners' greater interest in providing better healthcare to their pets, better-trained veterinarians, and improved diagnostic aids.
CVC Highlights: Canine influenza: Risks, management, and prevention
By Helio Autran de Morais, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (internal medicine and cardiology)
This virus is transmitted directly dog-to-dog. In fact, it is the first time that influenza has demonstrated efficient horizontal dog-to-dog transmission.
Don't miss these commonly misdiagnosed GI diseases
By David C. Twedt, DVM, DACVIM
Dr. David Twedt discusses how a handful of common gastrointestinal diseases in dogs and cats are frequently misdiagnosed, either because they are tricky to diagnose or they are not considered in the first place.
CVC Highlights: Dispelling the myth of the asocial cat
By Sharon L. Crowell-Davis, DVM, PhD, DACVB
Contrary to popular belief, cats are not asocial creatures.
CVC Highlights: Tapping social workers to help support distressed pet owners
By Petra A. Mertens, Dr Med Vet, CAAB, DECVBM, DACVB
Veterinarians celebrate the strengthening of the human-animal bond because it frequently allows us to provide improved medical care for our patients. However, this bond may also make handling a pet's death or deciding on the extent of an animal's treatment difficult for clients.
Departments
An Interview with... Dr. Corinne R. Sweeney
Always be honest, says this large-animal internal medicine specialist who helped treat Barbaro. The first error in medicine is making a mistake. The second error is lying about it.
Idea Exchange: A doggone easy way to identify your stethoscope
Many of our team members have the same style and color of stethoscope.
Idea Exchange: Squeeze stains rather than dip slides
For years I was troubled by artifacts on slides stained with Diff-Quik (Dade Behring) when I used the standard three-jar dip method.
Idea Exchange: Quicker, cleaner, and easier declaws
When I perform a feline onychectomy, after the tourniquet is loosely placed on the proximal part of the limb, I squeeze the paw with one hand and milk the rest of the limb toward the body several times before the technician tightens the tourniquet.
Idea Exchange: Incline patients to avoid aspiration during dental scaling
In addition to endotracheal intubation, to help keep patients from aspirating water from the dental scaler, we place patients on our wet treatment table on a slope by using a wooden riser.
Idea Exchange: Additional use for dental X-ray units
Since few practices can do horizontal beam radiography with standard machines in the operating room, dental radiographic units mounted on a mobile stand can be used to intraoperatively radiograph calculi at the base of the os penis.
Mind Over Miller: Kicked? Bitten? Scratched? What a great job!
By Robert M. Miller, DVM
When I moved to the Conejo Valley in California's Ventura County in 1957, the valley had never had a resident veterinary practitioner. Back then, the human population was small, limiting the number of available small-animal patients. However, there were thousands of beef cattle and horses in the area and, intriguingly, an abundance of exotic animals.

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