VETERINARY MEDICINE, Mar 1, 2007 - Veterinary Medicine
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VETERINARY MEDICINE, Mar 1, 2007
Features
Unfractionated and low-molecular-weight heparin for hypercoagulability in dogs and cats
By Bryan E. Harnett, DVM , Marie E. Kerl, DVM, DACVIM, DACVECC
A new type of heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, shows promise as an effective and easier-to-use form of therapy for people prone to thromboembolism. Does the same hold true for dogs and cats?
Help us help you! Getting the most from a diagnostic toxicology laboratory
By Petra A. Volmer, DVM, MS, DABVT, DABT
In suspected cases of toxicosis, reduce errors and receive more meaningful results by spending more time up-front communicating with and acquiring specimens for the diagnostic toxicology laboratory.
A challenging case: An unusual cause of blindness in a Siberian husky
By Juliet R. Gionfriddo, DVM, MS, DACVO
A 12-year-old 57-lb (26-kg) castrated male Siberian husky was presented to the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for evaluation of blindness of three weeks' duration, depression, and polydipsia.
Departments
An Interview with Dr. Joe Bartges
This music-loving internist and nutrition specialist finds practicing in the university setting to be a perfect fit, but he fears the declining interest in academic work by others. "It is becoming difficult to find people who are interested in staying in academia, and there doesn't seem to be a contingency plan in place to address this problem."
On the Forefront: Looking at canine angular limb deformities in a new way
By Derek B. Fox, DVM, PhD, DACVS
Angular limb deformities are common orthopedic conditions in dogs, and a wide variety of deformities can occur. These deformities have most commonly been described in the canine antebrachium.
That old, slow dog: Is it really arthritis?
By Julie D. Smith, DVM, DACVS
Geriatric dogs are commonly referred to us for evaluation of what clients call slowing down. Often the tentative diagnosis before referral is arthritis (or is interpreted by the client as such), and the dog is receiving an NSAID.
Practical Matters: Ultrasonography's limits in staging tumors
By Annette N. Smith, DVM, MS, DACVIM (oncology and small animal internal medicine)
Most oncologists perform staging in cancer patients to help determine treatment options and prognosis.
Practical Matters: Use lower doses of oxytocin for dystocia
By Margaret V. Root Kustritz, DVM, PhD, DACT
Oxytocin is a pituitary hormone that causes strong, coordinated contractions of the estrogen-primed uterus during parturition. It may be used therapeutically to relieve nonobstructive dystocia in bitches.
Clinical Exposures: Cytologic examination of a cutaneous mast cell tumor in a boxer
By Maria Vandis, DVM , Joyce S. Knoll, VMD, PhD, DACVP
A 7-year-old intact male boxer was evaluated because of a preputial dermal mass that had been present for about one year.
Idea Exchange: Getting a free-catch sample: two pans and a plan
To get a free-catch urine sample from a cat when you don't need a sterile sample, drill holes in a plastic litter pan, and nest that litter pan inside a normal litter box.
Idea Exchange: DIY dental radiograph viewer
If your hospital doesn't have a viewer for dental films, you can make a screen by using the cardboard in a large x-ray film box.
Idea Exchange: Stay a pole's length away from aggressive animals
A 3- or 4-ft wooden closet pole with a hook at the end works well to remove slip leashes from aggressive animals.
Idea Exchange: Baby your small patients
We have found that pre-formed disposable bottle liners are a perfect covering for a bandage or cast on a small animal.
Mind Over Miller: A lifetime of cartooning
By Robert M. Miller, DVM
When I meet a colleague for the first time, the question I am asked most commonly is "When did you start cartooning?"

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