VETERINARY MEDICINE, Sep 1, 2007 - Veterinary Medicine
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VETERINARY MEDICINE, Sep 1, 2007
Features
The latest management recommendations for cats and dogs with nonketotic diabetes mellitus
By Audrey K. Cook, BVM&S, MRCVS, DACVIM, DECVIM-CA
Underlying causes of diabetes mellitus, a common endocrinopathy in dogs and cats, include chronic pancreatic inflammation, pancreatic atrophy, and immune-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells.
Salivary mucoceles in cats: A retrospective study of seven cases
By Kristina M. Kiefer, DVM , Garrett J. Davis, DVM, DACVS
Salivary mucoceles are formed by the extravasation and accumulation of saliva in tissues adjacent to a salivary gland. The accumulated saliva incites an inflammatory response, leading to a walled-off accumulation of mucoid fluid.
Hyperlipidemia in dogs and cats
By Justin D. Thomason, DVM, DACVIM (small animal internal medicine) , Bente Flatland, DVM, DACVIM (internal medicine) , Clay A. Calvert, DVM, DACVIM (small animal internal medicine)
Hyperlipidemia is the increased concentration of triglyceride (hypertriglyceridemia), cholesterol (hypercholesterolemia), or both in the blood.
Departments
Letters: Thank you, Dr. Miller, for saving my life
No matter how healthy you look and feel, cancer may be lurking in your body.
Leading Off: Make sure you're up-to-date on your heartworm disease recommendations
By Sheldon Rubin, DVM
Do you recommend year-round preventives to help control parasitic disease and increase client compliance?
An Interview with Dr. William J. Kay
Having helped develop postgraduate programs at the Animal Medical Center, Dr. Kay urges veterinary students to take advantage of such educational opportunities as much as possible. "You will gain and grow in skill, confidence, and knowledge faster than at any other time in your career."
Practical Matters: Radiography helps confirm complete radiopaque calculi removal
By Daniel D. Smeak, DVM, DACVS
Cystotomy is commonly performed in small-animal practice to remove cystic calculi that cannot be treated medically or with other nonsurgical extraction techniques (urohydropropulsion, catheter or basket removal). Unfortunately, if numerous smaller calculi are present in the bladder and urethra, particularly in male dogs, the risk of leaving calculi after cystotomy can be as high as 15% to 20%.
Practical Matters: Carefully consider drug dosages in puppies and kittens
By Margaret V. Root Kustritz, DVM, PhD, DACT
Little research has been done demonstrating the pharmacokinetics of drugs commonly administered to puppies and kittens or defining the safe and effective doses of these drugs. When considering giving a particular drug, you must think about pediatric physiology and the absorption, metabolism, and excretion of the chosen drug.
Practical Matters: Use caution when prescribing transdermal medications for feline behavior problems
By Arnold Plotnick, MS, DVM, DACVIM, DABVP
Medicating a headstrong cat can be a challenge. However, compounding pharmacies have made the task easier by preparing many medications as flavored liquids, chewable treats, or transdermal gels.
Idea Exchange: Special euthanasia considerations when owners are present
When euthanizing a pet with its owners present, consider using the lateral saphenous vein rather than the cephalic vein.
Idea Exchange: When positioning dental film, sometimes you need an extra arm
We have always had trouble positioning dental film, so I invented this holder.
Idea Exchange: New use for vaccine packaging
Save empty plastic vaccine flats for use as disposable urine catchers.
Idea Exchange: Endotracheal tube organization
To organize endotracheal tubes, use adhesive cable clips (or clamps), which are available at most general stores.
Idea Exchange: Increase ear cleaning compliance
When I see a patient with ear problems, I ask the owner what he or she uses to clean the pet's ears.
Idea Exchange: Ticktock, ticktock, mark surgery time on the clock
An easy way to keep track of surgery time is to mark it on a clock.
Idea Exchange: A bell on the collar increases awareness of epileptic episodes
Attaching a bell to an epileptic pet's collar helps the owners notice when their pet is having a seizure.
Mind Over Miller: R-E-S-P-E-C-T: Find out what it means to new associates
By Robert M. Miller, DVM
After graduating from veterinary school, I spent a year doing relief work in Arizona. When I reported to my first job?a two-week hitch for a solo small-animal practitioner?the doctor came hurrying out of his home, which was connected to his clinic. He had his wife with him and some suitcases, and he handed me the key.

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