VETERINARY MEDICINE, Oct 1, 2007 - Veterinary Medicine
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VETERINARY MEDICINE, Oct 1, 2007
Features
Introduction: The euthanasia problem—how practitioners can help
By John Lofflin
Although the statistics vary, estimates suggest that three to four million animals are euthanized in U.S. animal shelters every year.
Offer basic behavior counseling for every pet at every visit
By John Lofflin
Misbehaving is the most dangerous thing a companion animal can do.
Behavior assessment checklist (PDF)
Have your clients fill out this behavior assessment form at every visit to identify any possible behavior problems.
Behavior history form (Word document)
Have your clients fill out this form if they indicate that they think their pet has a behavior problem.
Promote and perform early spaying and neutering
By John Lofflin
Shelters can adopt out only so many animals, says Kate Hurley, DVM, MPVM, director of the Koret Shelter Medicine Program at the University of California, Davis. So the biggest impact on euthanasia numbers will be on the intake side of the equation, not the adoption side.
Assist owners in selecting the best pets for their lifestyles
By John Lofflin
Although it is obvious to veterinarians that a Border collie and a 96-year-old woman likely make a poor pet-owner match, it may not be obvious to a potential owner who has never been around Border collies. Indeed, one reason healthy animals wind up in shelters, says Gail Golab, PhD, DVM, American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) interim director for animal welfare, is because people "acquire a pet with an expectation the pet doesn't fulfill."
Champion animal welfare in your community
By John Lofflin
On a hot Sunday morning in July, J.C. Burcham, DVM, and a colleague neuter 79 cats at a local animal welfare organization. Dr. Burcham, who practices in a large veterinary hospital in Olathe, Kan., knows firsthand about relinquishment and euthanasia.
Animal sheltering in the United States: Yesterday, today, and tomorrow
By Lila Miller, DVM
To effectively satisfy the rising demand for better preventive healthcare programs and veterinary services for shelter animals, veterinarians must understand the mission and goal of animal shelters and the resources available to them.
Departments
Toxicology Brief: The critical care of aflatoxin-induced liver failure in dogs
By Eva Furrow, VMD
This article focuses on the therapeutic management of canine aflatoxicosis, drawing from treatments used in other cases of hepatotoxicosis or hepatic failure.
Leading Off: Are you doing all you can to reduce euthanasia of healthy, adoptable pets?
By Janet M. Scarlett, DVM, PhD
Veterinarians have an obligation to protect the health of all animals.
An Interview with Dr. Kevin Fitzgerald
By Kevin Fitzgerald, PhD, DVM, DABVP
This practitioner, author, speaker, TV star, and comedian says veterinarians need to maintain the public's respect by examining their priorities. "We must stay true to the basis of our profession, which is to relieve suffering. It is a privilege to do what we do, not our right."
Idea Exchange: Cling wrap—not just for leftovers
When we needed an oxygen cage recently, we decided to make our own by covering the front of a cage with Press'n Seal (Glad) sealable plastic wrap.
Idea Exchange: Show clients you care with a memorial tree
For the past two years, our hospital has decorated a Christmas tree in honor of our patients that have passed away during the year.
Idea Exchange: Double-leash aggressive or fearful dogs
In our boarding facility, we double-leash aggressive, fearful, or unsure dogs to avoid having to reach around their necks to take the lead off.
Idea Exchange: Post-surgery paw wraps that fit like a glove
When wrapping cat paws after onychectomy, use a finger cut from a glove over some cotton and then tape it.
Idea Exchange: Keep muzzles organized and convenient
We recently replaced our paper towel holders and decided to use the old ones as muzzle racks.
Mind Over Miller: Finding a good home for a discarded animal
By Robert M. Miller, DVM
During the early days of television, a basset hound named Cleo popularized that formerly exotic breed.

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