VETERINARY MEDICINE SUPPLEMENT, Dec 1, 2006 - Veterinary Medicine
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VETERINARY MEDICINE SUPPLEMENT, Dec 1, 2006
Supplement
Get the answers you need about digital radiography
By Matt Wright, DVM, DACVR
Digital radiography is a hot topic in veterinary medicine. Some would even say it is the latest craze. Considering that digital radiography and a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) will initially cost a practice between $50,000 and $150,000, switching from film to digital images is not a decision to be taken lightly.
Digital radiography: Is it a good fit for your practice?
By Matt Wright, DVM, DACVR
Digital radiography is gaining popularity in veterinary medicine because it offers several advantages over traditional film-based radiography, including improved imaging latitude, fewer retakes, access to teleradiology, and improved patient care through better image quality.
Exploring your digital radiography equipment options
By Sarah M. Puchalski, DVM, DACVR
One of the first steps in switching to digital radiography is deciding which type of system to purchase.
Getting the most out of digital image viewing
By Sarah M. Puchalski, DVM, DACVR
Since digital radiography displays radiographs on computer monitors rather than as hard copies (film), an integral component of any digital radiography unit is the image display.
An introduction to DICOM
By Jonathan T. Shiroma, DVM, MS, DACVR
Digital Imaging Communications in Medicine (DICOM), a set of comprehensive communication standards, was developed to promote interoperability of digital imaging devices in human medicine.
How to store digital images and comply with medical recordkeeping standards
By Seth Wallack, DVM, DACVR
Several options for image storage systems are available, including on-site secure redundant storage, Network-Attached Storage, Storage Area Networks, recordable removable media, and off-site image backups.

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