VETERINARY MEDICINE, Aug 1, 2009 - Veterinary Medicine
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VETERINARY MEDICINE, Aug 1, 2009
Features
An update on feline infectious peritonitis
By Melissa A. Kennedy, DVM, PhD, DACVM (virology, immunology, bacteriology/mycology)
Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) remains a daunting disease—its pathogenesis is unclear, it can be difficult to diagnose, especially in the dry form, and it is uniformly fatal.
A challenging case: Primary hyperparathyroidism in a dog
By Michael R. Goldstein, DVM
An 8-year-old 50.6-lb (23-kg) neutered male Airedale terrier was presented to Forest Hill Animal Clinic for a wellness examination and laboratory tests.
Skills Laboratory: Reconstructive surgery techniques, Part 2: Adjustable horizontal mattress suture
By Steven F. Swaim, DVM, MS
The adjustable horizontal mattress suture is indicated primarily for limb wounds that are either relatively new or are in the wound contraction phase and in which the edges cannot initially be apposed.
Departments
Research Update: Dexamethasone complications in disk disease treatment
By Joseph Harari, MS, DVM, DACVS
Intervertebral disk disease (IVDD) is the most common neurologic disorder for which dog owners seek treatment.
Research Update: Factors relating to dog bite injuries: Identifying pointers for prevention
By Joseph Harari, MS, DVM, DACVS
Dog bites are one of the most common nonfatal injuries occurring in the United States.
Research Update: Transurethral lithotripsy in dogs: A minimally invasive option for urolith removal?
By Joseph Harari, MS, DVM, DACVS
Urolithiasis commonly affects dogs and can cause dysuria, stranguria, hematuria, pyuria, and an obstructive uropathy.
Research Update: Outlining the characteristics of gallbladder disease in dogs
By Joseph Harari, MS, DVM, DACVS
Gallbladder disease, a common condition in dogs, is associated with choleliths, mucoceles, neoplasia, or hepatic disorders causing bile stasis and possible subsequent infection.
Exercise-induced collapse in Labrador retrievers: A comparison with unaffected dogs
By Joseph Harari, MS, DVM, DACVS
Exercise-induced collapse in young, otherwise healthy, Labrador retrievers is an uncommon, dramatic, self-limiting condition.
How to safely lift fractious dogs
By John Ciribassi, DVM, DACVB
For many fractious dogs, it's safer to work with them on an exam room table instead of the floor.
Keep water blankets watertight
Cat claws and hot water blankets don't mix. Here's how to fix a water blanket when it springs leaks.
Help clients remember parasite preventives
Clients tell us they forget to administer their pets' monthly heartworm preventive or flea control—even when they put a reminder on the calendar.
Gross dermatology images educate clients
I take digital photos of cytologic exam and skin scraping findings (bacteria, mites) through one eyepiece of the microscope by using the camera's macro setting.
Mind Over Miller: The accidental patient
By Robert M. Miller, DVM
You may recall that the title of my first book was Most of My Patients Are Animals. Last year in this column, I related a couple of stories that illustrated the meaning of the title, with an emphasis on "most." Well, here are a few more.

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