VETERINARY MEDICINE, May 1, 2004 - Veterinary Medicine
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VETERINARY MEDICINE, May 1, 2004
Features
Challenging cases in internal medicine: A dog with an enlarged prostate and bloody preputial discharge
By John K. Sessions, DVM , Jeanne A. Barsanti, DVM, MS, DACVIM
A 5-year-old, 114-lb (51.8-kg) neutered male German shepherd was examined because of a three- to four-week history of bloody preputial discharge and prostatomegaly.
Successful maxilla reimplantation after traumatic injury in a dog
By Maria L.E. Faria, DVM, MS, PhD
Unlike in human medicine, post-traumatic facial reconstruction has received little attention in small-animal surgery.
Recognizing and treating esophageal disorders in dogs and cats
By Michael D. Willard, DVM, MS, DACVIM
Although esophageal disorders are less common than gastrointestinal diseases, they are not as rare as some practitioners think.
Departments
Toxicology Brief: Baclofen overdose in dogs
By Tina Wismer, DVM, DABVT, DABT
Baclofen is a centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxant.
On the Forefront: A new tool that detects ivermectin and other drug sensitivities in dogs
By Katrina L. Mealey, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DACVCP
When Rollie, a 10-year-old male Shetland sheepdog, was found to have transitional cell carcinoma, Rollie's veterinarian wanted to make sure that he could be safely treated with doxorubicin.
Practical Matters: Rule out Addison's disease in patients with possible renal failure
By Jörg M. Steiner, med.vet., Dr.med.vet., PhD, DACVIM, DECVIM-CA
Hypoadrenocorticism, or Addison's disease, in dogs is not a common disease but may be overlooked as a diagnosis.
Practical Matters: The disadvantages of digital tonometry in estimating intraocular pressure
By Rhea V. Morgan, DVM, DACVIM, DACVO
Although historically digital tonometry has been recommended as a means of estimating intraocular pressure in dogs and cats, I find the method extremely unreliable.
Practical Matters: Find the direction of skin tension when making skin incisions
By Giselle Hosgood, DVM, BVSc, MS, PhD, FACVSc, DACVS
When making skin incisions or excising masses or wounds, always orient the long axis of the incision or ellipse along the line of skin tension.
Practical Matters: Make sure to differentiate incontinence from behavioral elimination problems
By Katherine Houpt, VMD, PhD, DACVB
If a cat is housesoiling and the owner is finding large pools of urine in a discreet area or small amounts on vertical surfaces, the animal is not incontinent.

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