VETERINARY MEDICINE, Sep 1, 2004 - Veterinary Medicine
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VETERINARY MEDICINE, Sep 1, 2004
Features
Alternative anticonvulsant drugs for dogs with seizure disorders
By Curtis W. Dewey, DVM, MS, DACVIM (neurology), DACVS , Georgina Barone, DVM, DACVIM (neurology) , Kerry Smith, DVM , Gregg D. Kortz, DVM, DACVIM (neurology)
Seizure disorders represent the most frequent neurologic problem encountered in dogs.
Using high-frequency radio wave technology in veterinary surgery
By William W. Miller, DVM, MS, DACVO
Like a scalpel, radiosurgery provides a sense of tactile sensation. And as with a laser, with radiosurgery there is an absence of tissue resistance.
Departments
Editors' Note: Picking up where your schooling may have left off
By Margaret Rampey
When you were in veterinary school, how many hours did you devote to studying dentistry?
Letters: Raising uncomfortable questions
I would like to comment on the "Idea Exchange" item in your July issue titled "A bear essential for school groups."
Letters: Was butorphanol adequate?
We read with interest the "Clinical Exposures" case report "A peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in a cat" in the April 2004 issue. While the diagnostic and surgical management of this case was excellent, the analgesic support was inadequate.
Practical Matters: "Normal" and "reference range" are not the same
By Anthony P. Carr, Dr. med. vet., DACVIM (small animal internal medicine)
Reference ranges are established by testing a group of apparently healthy normal animals. But even if a value falls within the reference range, it may not be normal for that animal if the animal is ill.
Practical Matters: Consider chemotherapy in these cases, but set your goal first
By Kevin A. Hahn, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (oncology)
Localized primary tumors with a minimal risk for metastasis are commonly treated with surgery or radiation. But chemotherapy may occasionally be used to treat these tumors instead of or in addition to standard local therapy.
Practical Matters: How to handle nonhealing corneal ulcers in dogs
By Steve R. Hollingsworth, DVM, DACVO
When seemingly routine corneal ulcers in dogs fail to heal in a normal period (i.e. seven to 10 days), many veterinarians engage in musical chairs treatment, prescribing one topical antibiotic and then another.
Toxicology Brief: Helping animals exposed to the herbicide paraquat
By R.B. Cope, BSc, BVSc, PhD
Last summer, an epizootic of paraquat poisoning caused the deaths of at least seven dogs in Portland, Ore. This epizootic is evidence that this type of poisoning remains a current problem in companion-animal practice in North America.
Dental Corner: Using intraoral regional anesthetic nerve blocks
By Daniel T. Carmichael, DVM, DAVDC
Local anesthesia and regional anesthetic nerve blocks have been used for decades in human dentistry, but incorporating intraoral regional anesthetic blocks into veterinary dental and oral surgical procedures did not gain acceptance until the mid-1990s.
Idea Exchange: Make copies of all instructions to clients
When we put a warning label on a bottle, such as "May increase urination" or "Give with food," we put the same label next to the prescription in the patient's record, so we know exactly what we told the client.
Idea Exchange: Teach clients to control pets' seizures
Performing vagal maneuvers on epileptic pets can help prevent or control seizures.
Idea Exchange: Another way to keep patients warm and under wraps
To keep patients warm during and after surgery, we insert sheets of flat bubble wrap into flannel pillowcases and drape them over patients.
Idea Exchange: Garment bags keep endoscopes out of the way
Instead of keeping our endoscopes in a bulky cabinet, we mounted the holders inside a long garment bag attached to the wall.
Idea Exchange: Combat super-sized pets
How many times has a client said, "But I only give my pet one scoop of food," and then you find out he or she is using a shovel?
Idea Exchange: Help clients get to the source of housesoiling problems
Feline urinary problems can frustrate both owners and veterinarians.
Idea Exchange: Here's a little something to warm pets up
We use the bladders from emptied 2-gal wine boxes as heating pads for animals.
Mind Over Miller: A clue to calmness
By Robert M. Miller, DVM
Gentle pressure can comfort, calm, reassure, and increase receptivity.

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