VETERINARY MEDICINE, Oct 1, 2004 - Veterinary Medicine
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VETERINARY MEDICINE, Oct 1, 2004
Features
Symposium introduction: Skin reconstruction techniques
By Karen M. Tobias, DVM, MS, DACVS
Veterinarians routinely deal with lacerations, bite wounds, and mass removals in small-animal practice. When wound closure becomes difficult because of the location of the wound or the size of the mass, however, even the most confident veterinarian can be intimidated by the prospect of these surgeries.
Skin reconstruction techniques: Full-thickness mesh grafts
By Amanda Gibbs, BS , Karen M. Tobias, DVM, MS, DACVS
A mesh Graft is a full- or partial-thickness sheet of skin that has been fenestrated to allow drainage and expansion.
Skin reconstruction techniques: Z-plasty as an aid to tension-free wound closure
By Cary Bosworth, BS , Karen M. Tobias, DVM, MS, DACVS
A Z-shaped incision can be created in an area of high skin tension to allow skin relaxation and lengthening. A Z-plasty involves transposing the two interdigitating flaps of skin formed by the incision.
A challenging case: An emaciated cat with abdominal distention
By Ashley B. Saunders, DVM , Dianne I. Mawby, DVM, MVSc, DACVIM , Michael F. McEntee, DVM, DACVP
A 9-year-old neutered male domestic shorthaired cat had been presented to the referring veterinarian for evaluation of lethargy and weight loss.
Departments
Editors' Note: Keep reading
By Margaret Rampey
That's Dr. Richard Bartels in the blue scrub top. Along with 26 other veterinarians, he attended one of the joint stabilization wet labs at this year's Central Veterinary Conference in Kansas City, Mo.
Endoscopy Brief: Gastric foreign body removal with laparoscopy
By Timothy C. McCarthy, DVM, PhD, DACVS
A 9-month-old intact male Labrador retriever was presented two weeks after it swallowed a Ping-Pong ball.
Clinical Exposures: Pulmonary thrombosis due to idiopathic main pulmonary artery disease
By R. Lee Pyle, VMD, MS, DACVIM (cardiology) , Michael D. King, BVSc , Geoffrey K. Saunders, DVM, DACVP , David L. Panciera, DVM, DACVIM
A 10-year-old 35.9-lb (16.3-kg) intact female Wheaton terrier was referred to the teaching hospital at Virginia Tech for evaluation of dyspnea.
On the Forefront: Frameless stereotactic CT-guided needle brain biopsy
By Filippo Adamo, DVM, DECVN
Recently, a technique has been developed that allows veterinary neurosurgeons to obtain a biopsy sample of the brain: a frameless stereotactic CT-guided needle biopsy.
Idea Exchange: Relieve the pressure on paralyzed pets
Animals that are recumbent or paralyzed for extended periods can develop pressure sores.
Idea Exchange: Preempt inappropriate refill requests
To discourage clients from asking for refills without getting their pets reexamined, we place big "No refill without exam" stickers on appropriate medicine bottles.
Idea Exchange: Help clients understand radiographs
We place clear laminate sheets over our radiographs, so we can point out to clients what we are talking about without actually marking on the radiograph.
Idea Exchange: Make measuring small lesions easier
To quickly and easily measure small lesions, use Schirmer tear test strips.
Idea Exchange: An easier way to infuse anal glands
Use an 18-ga (or larger) metal avian feeding tube attached to a syringe to infuse anal glands.
Idea Exchange: A picture is worth 1,000 words
To convince skeptical clients that their pets can eat and drink with an Elizabethan collar on, we took a picture of a patient doing just that and posted the picture by the checkout desk.
Idea Exchange: Catheters facilitate intranasal vaccination in toy breeds
Our practice clientele includes several Chihuahua and Maltese breeders as well as those specializing in other toy breeds.
Idea Exchange: A handy way to store client pamphlets
We installed multiple clear file holders together on a wall that separates two exam rooms, creating easy access to a multitude of client pamphlets.
Idea Exchange: Provide kids with educational entertainment
I create word search and crossword puzzles to occupy the older children in the reception area who find the free coloring books "babyish."
Mind Over Miller: It's not perfect, but it's the best we can do
By Robert M. Miller, DVM
It is inevitable that the United States will eventually have socialized medicine, as many other industrialized capitalist nations already have.

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