VETERINARY MEDICINE, Aug 1, 2005 - Veterinary Medicine
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VETERINARY MEDICINE, Aug 1, 2005
Features
Answering Your Questions: Practical analgesia in cats
By Lesley J. Smith, DVM, DACVA
Because cats are relatively quiet creatures, that is, they don't bark, whine, and announce themselves, their analgesic needs are often ignored or forgotten. Evaluating pain in cats is challenging and requires intense and prolonged observation, intuition, interaction with the animal, and knowledge of the various feline behaviors that may signal pain.
Skills Laboratory: How to collect diagnostic bone marrow samples
By Kristen R. Friedrichs, DVM, DACVP , Karen M. Young, VMD, PhD
Bone marrow aspirate evaluation may not be in your primary diagnostic toolbox, but it is essential for diagnosing many disorders.
A challenging case: A dog with ocular masses
By Juliet R. Gionfriddo, DVM, MS, DACVO , Brendan Mangan, DVM, MS , Greg Wilkerson, DVM , Cynthia C. Powell, DVM, MS, DACVO , Deborah S. Friedman, DVM, DACVO , E.J. Ehrhart, DVM, PhD, DACVP
A middle-aged 48.5-lb (22-kg) spayed female Border collie mix was presented to the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for evaluation of a red, weepy left eye.
Idiosyncrasies in greyhounds that can affect their medical care
By William E. Feeman III, DVM
Over thousands of years, greyhounds have been bred and selected for speed. This selective breeding may explain a number of the idiosyncrasies we see in the breed today. Retired racing greyhounds are becoming more common pets and more common patients in veterinary hospitals. It is estimated that about 18,000 greyhounds are placed into homes as pets annually. This article will familiarize practitioners with some idiosyncrasies in greyhounds that can affect their medical care.
Departments
Editors' Guest: Are you doing your best to protect pets and their owners?
By Michael Paul, DVM
At one time, rampant infectious diseases sickened and killed many animals. In the case of rabies, people also were at risk. Today in the Western world, these diseases have largely been controlled, and as vaccines improve and more animals are vaccinated appropriately, we will do even better. But what of parasitic diseases?
An Interview with... Dr. Patricia N. Olson
Many important issues are facing the veterinary profession, but veterinarians should not be daunted, says this leader of a foundation charged with improving the lives of companion animals and wildlife. "Be persistent in what you believe in, and don't give up."
Toxicology Brief: Allium species poisoning in dogs and cats
By R.B. Cope, BSc, BVSc, PhD
Wild and domesticated Allium species have been used for culinary and ethnomedicinal purposes since the beginning of recorded history.
Idea Exchange: It's not just for ears
An effective way to wipe up anal gland secretions is with a little of your favorite ear-cleaning solution on a gauze square.
Idea Exchange: Booties keep paws clean and dry
Any pet that leaves our hospital after undergoing surgery on or suffering trauma to its paws, which necessitates keeping the area clean and dry, is sent home with Gore-Tex (W.L. Gore & Associates) booties.
Idea Exchange: What to wear when white makes patients see red
Wear a nonwhite laboratory coat or a scrub shirt for pets with white coat syndrome.
Idea Exchange: Bathing large dogs with less mess
I own a 90-lb atopic dog that needs routine bathing, so I know what a chore it is for clients to bathe their large dogs with atopic dermatitis twice a week.
Idea Exchange: Keep blood pressure cuffs handy and organized
Use a Velcro (Velcro Industries) strip to keep blood pressure cuffs organized.
Idea Exchange: Sterilized needle holder (an antiquated idea from 1956)
A 5-cc blood tube or unit rabies vial that is rubber-shaped provides an excellent method of carrying or sterilizing hypodermic needles.
Idea Exchange: An easy way to soak paws
When a cat or small dog has a paw lesion that requires daily soaking, we send the owner home with a 16-dram pill vial.
Mind Over Miller: People say the darndest things
By Robert M. Miller, DVM
When I was in college, I spent summer vacations taking tourists on horse pack trips in the Rocky Mountains. During that time, I was asked some incredibly stupid questions. So when I travel, I like to ask tour guides what the dumbest questions they've ever been asked are. The usual response is "You wouldn't believe me!" I always tell them, "Oh, yes, I would."

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