Clinical Edge, Jun 1, 2006 - Veterinary Medicine
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Veterinary Medicine

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Clinical Edge, Jun 1, 2006
Allergic dermatitis
Canine allergic dermatitis: Pathogenesis, clinical signs, and diagnosis
By Karen A. Moriello, DVM, DACVD
In the simplest terms, allergic dermatitis refers to any inflammatory skin disease caused by any type of allergy. The unifying characteristic of these diseases is that they cause pruritus and subsequent inflammation. Depending on the etiology, the event may be short-lived or become a lifelong condition. Table 1 lists the reported allergic diseases of small animals. 1,2 These diseases are rarely uncomplicated and often involve secondary infections. Furthermore, more than one core allergic disease is often present concurrently. These factors can make diagnosis and management of allergic dermatitis cases challenging.
Corticosteroids
The proper use of topical and oral corticosteroids
By Carlo Vitale, DVM, DACVD
Corticosteroids are among the most used and misused medications in veterinary medicine. They exert a powerful, reliable, and rapid effect, and there is no viable, more effective therapeutic alternative in animals with certain skin conditions. Topical and oral corticosteroid therapies are considered the first choice for treatment of acute and chronic inflammatory skin diseases, particularly allergic dermatitis. In addition, they aid in the inflammation associated with some types of infections, primarily Malassezia dermatitis and otitis.
Topical therapy
The role of topical therapy in the successful treatment of allergic dermatitis
By Rusty Muse, DVM, DACVD
Topical therapy is an important - and in many cases essential - component of successfully managing allergic dermatitis in dogs. When used as an adjunctive treatment for generalized disease, topical therapy often minimizes dependence on systemic medications that may be deleterious to the patient's health. In addition, topical therapy may be more effective in treating localized or regionalized pruritus.
Case study
Topical triamcinolone and allergic dermatitis: A case study
By Claudia Nett-Mettler, Dr. MED. VET., DACVD, DECVD
Triamcinolone topical solution is an effective and safe alternative to systemically administered corticosteroids.
Clinical note
Studies show triamcinolone topical spray is as safe as placebo and as effective as oral prednisone
Recent research has shown that topical low-concentration (0.015%) triamcinolone acetonide spray is safe and effective for the treatment of allergic pruritus, including flea allergic dermatitis in dogs.
Feline Medicine
Monitoring diabetes mellitus in diabetic cats (Sponsored by Intervet Schering-Plough Animal Health)
By Nancy Suska, DVM MBA
Protocols for monitoring diabetic cats have evolved over the years. Random spot-checking a blood glucose concentration, although easy to perform, is unacceptable as the sole means of monitoring because it cannot accurately represent the cat's response to insulin. Therefore other methods of monitoring diabetic cats need to be employed.

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