VETERINARY MEDICINE, Jul 1, 2006 - Veterinary Medicine
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VETERINARY MEDICINE, Jul 1, 2006
Features
Optimize intestinal parasite detection with centrifugal fecal flotation
By Byron L. Blagburn, MS, PhD , Jamie M. Butler, BS
Failure to use best-practice techniques, such as centrifugation, when conducting fecal flotation procedures can result in failure to detect parasite stages in fecal samples. In this article, we review the basics of fecal flotation techniques and describe step-by-step procedures for conducting accurate and effective centrifugal flotation procedures.
How to identify the cause of weight loss in geriatric cats
By Anne Mattson, DVM, MS, DACVIM
Unfortunately, weight changes in older cats are often attributed merely to aging, so clients may not seek veterinary care or veterinarians may inadvertently delay a diagnostic workup until marked weight loss is evident or additional clinical signs arise. Starting with a detailed history, work your way through a complete workup in these patients.
Departments
Editors' Guest: Why we gave fecal centrifugation a spin
By Philip VanVranken, DVM
A few years ago, our veterinarians and licensed veterinary technicians learned that centrifugation of fecal samples was the superior test for diagnosing gastrointestinal parasitism.
An Interview with... Dr. Robin Downing
"Our ability to recognize and respond to animal pain is in its infancy," says this practitioner, author, and president of the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management. "There are still animals that suffer needlessly because of our deficiencies."
Practical Matters: Intravenous solutions: Should I worry about osmolarity?
By Deborah Silverstein, DVM, DACVECC
Peripheral venous catheters are most commonly used to deliver intravenous fluids and drugs. However, administering hyperosmolar solutions may cause vascular endothelial damage and thrombophlebitis.
Practical Matters: Urine cortisol:creatinine ratio—the most useful normal test around
By Nyssa J. Reine, DVM, DACVIM (small animal internal medicine)
Definitively diagnosing canine hyperadrenocorticism (Cushing's disease) can be exceptionally difficult because nonadrenal illness can affect the test results. However, I think that the urine cortisol:creatinine ratio (UC:Cr) serves an invaluable role in ruling out canine Cushing's disease since a dog with a normal UC:Cr almost assuredly does not have Cushing's disease.
Practical Matters: Setting the stage for successful referrals
By Stan Rubin, DVM, MS, DACVIM (small animal internal medicine)
It is a big decision for both you and your client to refer your patient to a university or other specialty practice for further workup or tertiary care.
Dental Corner: Canine orthodontics: Providing healthy occlusions
By Daniel T. Carmichael, DVM, DAVDC
The idea of orthodontic correction for dogs frequently elicits snickers and causes uninformed eyes to roll.
Idea Exchange: Distract frisky ferrets with a tasty treat
The best way to get these active little patients to hold still for examinations, injections, weighing, or blood draws is to give them some FerreTone (8 in 1).
Idea Exchange: Birthday bones build bonds
A local doggy treat baker provides us with these birthday bones, complete with a candle, a built-in candle holder, and plastic wrap.
Idea Exchange: Dispense drugs in diluent vials
We save the empty sterile diluent vials to use as containers for medicine dispensed in small amounts, such as meloxicam for cats or antibiotics or anthelmintics for tiny exotic animals.
Idea Exchange: Interesting radiographs make intriguing art
Our practice owner made attractive framed displays of interesting radiographs and pertinent history to educate and occupy our clients while they wait in the exam rooms.
Idea Exchange: Handmade memorial blankets are a special way to show you care
At our mainly exotics practice, we found it hard to return children's pet parakeets and hamsters to them in cardboard boxes after the pets passed away.
Idea Exchange: If the splint fits...find it
One of our technicians came up with this idea to use a shoe rack that hands over a door to organize our splints.
Mind Over Miller: Will the real Dr. Miller please stand up?
By Robert M. Miller, DVM
In Thousand Oaks, Calif., my hometown, there is another Robert Miller, a retired engineer, and I feel sorry for him. He gets calls from all over the country intended for me.

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