Companion Animal Parasite Forecast Map 2014 - Anaplasmosis

Companion Animal Parasite Forecast Map 2014 - Anaplasmosis

The CAPC Parasite Forecast Maps track millions of data points and factors such as temperature, elevations, precipitation, and population density to predict the risk of vector-borne diseases. This update on anaplasmosis give you the key findings.
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May 18, 2014
By dvm360.com staff

Key findings
> Higher than normal levels are forecasted for Oregon and Washington, west of the Cascades
> Higher than normal levels are forecasted throughout Indiana
> Higher than normal levels are forecasted in upstate New York, New Hampshire and Vermont

About the maps
Since 2011, CAPC has been collecting data and developing the CAPC Parasite Forecast Maps. These maps give veterinarians a client education tool that supports year-round protection against parasites.The methodology is similar to that used by NOAA for hurricane forecasts. Millions of data points are tracked and combined with factors such as temperature, elevation, precipitation and population density to predict the risk of vector-borne diseases like Anaplasmosis, which can be a serious threat to a dog's health. To see more of the 2014 CAPC Parasite Forecast Maps or to learn more about Anaplasmosis, please visit capcvet.org.

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